Tyrannosaurus rex welcomed by children


This Dutch 26 August 2016 video is about the arrival on Beestenmarkt square in Leiden city of the fossil Tyrannosaurus rex Trix.

Trix was welcomed there by many children and adults. Then, she continued to Naturalis museum.

Tyrannosaurus rex to Naturalis museum, video


This is a 26 August 2016 Dutch video with English subtitles about bringing a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil from the USA to Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

Tyrannosaurus rex welcomed in Leiden


This 2 June 2016 video is about a Camarasaurus and other dinosaurs at Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

This morning, a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, excavated in Montana in the USA, arrived at Schiphol airport in the Netherlands.

From Schiphol, it continued to Naturalis museum, preceded by paleontologists/biologists Anne Schulp and Freek Vonk, cheerleaders, a brass band, police and a flowery Tyrannosaurus on a float.

Tyrannosaurus rex float, 26 August 2016

This photo of the float is a cell phone picture, like the others in this blog post.

Tyrannosaurus rex float, Beestenmarkt, 26 August 2016

They proceeded to a welcome party at Beestenmarkt square in Leiden, where hundreds of school children and others were expecting the tyrannosaur, named Trix.

Tyrannosaurus rex truck, 26 August 2016

People had to move back, as a fence had to be moved, as there was not enough space for the float to pass between the fence and a lamppost.

Tyrannosaurus rex truck, on 26 August 2016

Behind the float was the truck with the fossil Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton.

Puerto Rican birds, why do they sing early?


This video from Puerto Rico says about itself:

7 April 2011

Episode 1: Adelaide’s warbler (reinita mariposera)

From Science News:

Warm-up benefit could explain morning birdsong

Dawn tune-up may improve sound for attracting mates

By Susan Milius

6:00am, August 25, 2016

WASHINGTON — Vocally warming up puts more dazzle into a bird’s singing for the day, a new test shows, perhaps helping to explain widespread outbursts of birdsong at dawn.

Males of Puerto Rico’s Adelaide’s warblers (Setophaga adelaidae) start trilling through their repertoires of 30 or so songs while it’s still pitch black. Tracking the songs of individual males showed that the order of performance had a strong effect on performance quality, behavioral ecologist David Logue said August 17 at the North American Ornithological Conference. In the early versions of particular songs, males didn’t quickly change pitch as well as they did later, Logue, of the University of Lethbridge in Canada, and colleagues found.

This was the first test for a warm-up effect for daily singing among birds, Logue said. To catch the full stretch of repetitions of songs, Orlando J. Medina (now with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) had to beat the warblers at getting out of the nest in the morning. His recordings of each of nine males’ morning performance for four days allowed computer analysis of how fast a male swept through his trills.

Time of day alone didn’t explain the improvement in singing. So Logue and study coauthor Hannes Schraft, now at San Diego State University, don’t think that factors like increasing light or rising temperatures could explain the improvements. The robust effect of repetition leads Logue to propose what may be a new explanation for big dawn choruses: Males warming up sooner would fare better in competing for mates. Over time, a melodious arms race could have broken out as earlier warm-ups were beaten by even earlier ones.

Ways to beat heat have hidden costs for birds. Panting, seeking shade affect food foraging: here.

American western scrub-jay split into two species


This video from the USA says about itself:

Woodhouse’s Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma woodhouseii) Sitting on a Branch – Colorado – April 29, 2016

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Farewell, Western Scrub-Jay!

We have an important update for you those of you living in the Western Scrub-Jay’s range: this species was recently split into two distinct species. Perhaps you have noticed differences between the “coastal” form (now the California Scrub-Jay) and the “interior” form (now Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay); the California Scrub-Jay is darker and described as having a bold personality, while the Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay is paler, has a thinner bill, and tends to be more shy and inconspicuous.

The American Ornithologists’ Union has been considering this split for several years. The split became official after genetic research demonstrated that the two species rarely interbreed where they come into contact with each other in western Nevada. In most of California, and all of Oregon and Washington, you will be reporting California Scrub-Jays from now on. If you live in Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, or Texas, then Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jays are the scrub-jays you’re seeing.

What do you need to do?

In most cases, nothing. As always, NestWatch will only show you geographically-relevant species when you are entering your nests, so unless you live in the small range of overlap in western Nevada, your species menu will highlight the appropriate choice. We will soon be updating historical nest records to reflect this change, so you do not need to edit previous records. We could really use photos of both species’ nests and eggs, so we’re asking everyone with photos to please share them with us.

Tyrannosaurus rex brought to museum this Friday


This is a Dutch June 2016 video, recorded in Montana in the USA. It is about assembling fossil Tyrannosaurus rex Trix for transportation to Naturalis museum in the Netherlands; and about excavating Triceratops fossils not far away.

Dutch NOS TV reports today that on Friday 26 August, a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton will be brought from Schiphol airport to Naturalis museum in Leiden.

The fossil dinosaur is probably an elderly female. Her name is Trix.

Three years ago, Trix was found in Montana in the USA. This animal will make Naturalis the only museum outside the US with a Tyrannosaurus rex.

On 10 September, Trix will be at a special tyrannosaur exhibition.

From the end of 2018 on, she will be part of the regular Naturalis exhibition.

Tyrannosaurus rex quest on video


This 17 August 2016 Dutch video shows how scientists of Naturalis museum in Leiden went to the USA to look for Tyrannosaurus rex fossils.