Wadden Sea breeding birds, new research


This video says about itself:

Wadden Sea Flyway” phenomenon of migration and threats for birds

6 February 2014

Great video showing importance of migration routes and what we can do to make sure they are protected in the future.

BirdLife Partner Vogelbescherming Nederland (Netherlands Society for the Protection of Birds) helped to produce this video along with many other organizations showing the importance of the Wadden Sea Flyway.

A new report has been published about breeding birds in the Wadden Sea area in the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark, from 1991 to 2013.

A few species increased then, like great cormorants, spoonbills and lesser black-backed gulls. Other species, like shelduck and Sandwich tern, were stable. Unfortunately, there was a decline in many other species, like hen harrier, avocet and black-tailed godwit. Herring gulls are down in the Dutch and German parts of the Wadden Sea, but up in the Danish part.

Rare green snaketail dragonfly news


This is a 2009 video, showing a green snaketail dragonfly along the Roer river in Limburg province in the Netherlands.

Translated from the Dutch Vlinderstichting entomologists:

Friday, July 31, 2015

It’s a good year for the green snaketail dragonfly. This rare species has been absent for decades in the Netherlands, but since 1996 it’s back in Limburg [province]. Three years ago, the green snaketail dragonfly was seen along the Dommel [river in North Brabant province] and it has been seen there once again.

Good black-winged stilt news


This video shows a black-winged stilt at its nest; amidst coots, black-headed gulls, and other birds.

Albert de Jong reported on 31 July 2015 about the black-winged stilt nesting season in the Netherlands.

2015 was a good year for these mainly South European birds: at least fifteen Dutch nesting couples. Many chicks fledged, which may sometimes be a problem for this species.

White-beaked dolphin news from Britain


This video is about white-beaked dolphins near a ship in the North Sea.

From the Sea Watch Foundation in Britain:

White-beaked dolphins … EVERYWHERE!

July 29, 2015

by Megan Evans

It has come to our attention here at the Sea Watch Foundation that white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) have a been a common feature on our coastlines recently!

White-beaked dolphins are short-beaked oceanic dolphins found within the family Delphinidae (also the family of the well known bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus). These dolphins get their name from their short beak, which has a distinguishable white tip; although this may not always be the case, making identifying these dolphins a fairly difficult task! However all is not lost, as unlike their very similar looking cousins the Atlantic white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus acutus) they have a white saddle patch found behind a very distinctively hooked dorsal fin, white stripes, and are slightly larger at 3.1m in length.

Although white-beaked dolphins can be seen around the UK, as they inhabit North Atlantic temperate to subpolar waters, they are more regularly spotted offshore in the Southern North Sea. However, from April this year we at Sea Watch have received a number of unusual and exciting sightings from coastal areas spanning from Devon on the South coast all the way to Caithness at the top of Scotland (see table 1)! These sightings also included an unusual sighting near Southwold in Suffolk (see our previous blog).

Table 1. Sighting location, number of white-beaked dolphins spotted, and the observer

Sighting location, number of white-beaked dolphins spotted, and the observer

Along with letting us know about their encounters, a number of observers also provided us with some fantastic photographs; incredibly useful pieces of information when it comes to verifying any of the sightings we receive.

Good Sandwich tern news from Ameland island


This video from the Netherlands says about itself:

A large colony of Sandwich Terns with brooding birds and chicks on a beach of shells. The chicks all vary in age, and a few of the older birds carry fish in their beaks.

Warden Robert Pater reports today from Ameland island in the Netherlands. He writes that 2015 has been a succesful nesting seasons for black-headed gulls and terns at the Feugelpôlle nature reserve.

About 100 young Sandwich terns have been provided with white coloured rings. Last year, the young terns got red rings.

New nectar-feeding bat species discovered in Brazil


This video says about itself:

Green Ambassador Brazil Bat Research

11 May 2007

With the University of Campo Grande the Green Ambassadors researched the biodiversity of bats in the Pantanal, Brazil. Where over 700 plant species depend on bats for pollination.

The video is in Portuguese, but its subtitles can be switched to English or other languages.

From Wildlife Extra:

New bat species discovered

A new species of nectar-feeding bat from Brazil has been unexpectedly discovered during a study into the whole genus of Lonchophylla.

The scientists Drs. Ricardo Moratelli and Daniela Dias examined both wild and museum specemins of L. mordax, when they realised, rather than looking at one species they were looking at two different species.

Called L. inexpectata, the new species has considerably paler ventral (abdominal) fur and some of their measurements were inconsistent with L. mordax, including differences in the skull and the teeth morphology.

The scientific description of the new species is here.

Common scoters not migrating together


This video is called Male common scoter (Melanitta nigra).

From daily The Independent in South Africa:

Birds of a feather don’t fly together

July 28 2015 at 08:53am

London – The British Royal Family famously never travel on the same plane to ensure the survival of the monarchy in the event of a disaster.

Now scientists say Britain’s most endangered duck employs a similar tactic by splitting up when it comes to their migration.

Despite its name, the common scoter is down to just 40 breeding pairs in the UK – mostly in the Scottish Highlands.

Researchers who tagged four birds nesting in the same loch found they flew to different winter locations in Scotland, Ireland and Morocco.

A spokesperson for the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust said: “The fact they stay apart in winter is a bit like the Royal Family never flying together – it means they can’t all be affected by a single issue like a storm or oil spill.”

The discovery is useful in the trust’s attempts to discover what is behind the falling population in Britain as the scoter is thriving elsewhere. “Whatever is causing their decline is more likely to be in the summer when they’re all together in the Highlands,” said the spokesperson.

Common scoters and other birds in Scheveningen, the Netherlands: here.