Queen Nefertiti discovered in Pharaoh Tutankhamun’s grave?


This video says about itself:

Hidden Chamber in King Tut’s Tomb May Contain Nefertiti

11 August 2015

A researcher claims to have found a ‘ghost’ doorway hiding beneath the plaster on the wall of the burial chamber, which he believes leads to the tomb of the ruler’s supposed mother, Queen Nefertiti.

By Rossella Lorenzi:

Hidden King Tut Rooms May Contain Metal, Organics

March 17, 2016 07:20 AM ET

The tomb of King Tutankhamun conceals two rooms that could contain metal or organic material, Egypt’s antiquities minister said Thursday.

Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty told a press conference that analysis of radar scans carried out by Japanese specialist Hirokatsu Watanabu revealed two hidden spaces on the north and eastern walls of the 3,300-year-old tomb.

“Furthermore, based on the GPR data, curves that might indicate doors were also detected above the cavities, which can be seen as an entrance to those cavities,” al-Damaty said.

Who Else May Be in King Tut’s Tomb?

The metal and organic material possibly revealed by the scans strongly suggest to the presence of a another burial, boostering a claim by Nicholas Reeves, a British Egyptologist at the University of Arizona.

In July 2015 Reeves published a paper arguing that high-resolution images of the tomb’s walls show “distinct linear traces” pointing to the presence of two still unexplored chambers.

“It does look from the radar evidence as if the tomb of Tutankhamun is a corridor tomb and it continues beyond the decorated burial chamber,” Reeves said at a press conference last November.

King Tut’s Tomb May Hide Nefertiti’s Secret Grave

According to Reeves, one hidden chamber would contain the remains, and possibly the intact grave goods, of queen Nefertiti, wife of the “heretic” monotheistic pharaoh Akhenaten, Tutankhamun’s father.

Reeves speculated that the tomb of King Tut was not ready when he died unexpectedly at 19 in 1323 B.C., after having ruled a short reign of nine to 10 years. Consequently, he was buried in a rush in what was originally the tomb of Nefertiti, who had died 10 years earlier.

According to al-Damaty, the hidden chambers could contain the tomb of a member of King Tut’s family. However, he did not speculate on Nefertiti.

Weird Facts About King Tut and His Mummy

New scans will be conducted later this month to reconstruct the exact size of the chambers and the best way to proceed with the investigation.

According to al-Damaty, multiple steps are planned in coming months to unveil new clues about the secrets of King Tut.

“It’s a rediscovery that might lead us to the discovery of the century,” al-Damaty said.

Ancient settlement discovery in England


This video from Britain says about itself:

13 October 2014

Archaeology students from the University of Hull have carried out an archaeological dig on the Yorkshire Wolds in East Yorkshire, over the summer of 2014.

Students discovered a great amount of exciting finds at this Iron Age site including a miniature axe, a bone needle, pottery and – perhaps most exciting – an Arras burial.

Hull and its surroundings is a region of superb archaeological wealth. There are few better regions in Britain to study archaeology. The countryside of Eastern Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire contains a wealth of archaeological remains, and its historic centres, such as Hull and Beverley, provide well preserved evidence for the development of medieval townscapes.

For many students, fieldwork is one of the highlights of their degree, and at Hull we regard field teaching as a vital part of our courses.

For more information about studying at Archaeology at the University of Hull visit www.hull.ac.uk/archaeology.

From the Hull Daily Mail in England:

Iron Age settlement discovered in Pocklington of ‘national significance’

By HDMJCampbell

March 17, 2016

A 2,500-year-old settlement has been discovered during work on a housing development in Pocklington.

The Iron Age find has been described as of ‘national significance’.

The site includes more than 75 square barrows that contained 180 skeletons from the Arras Culture – a group of people who lived in the region in the Middle Iron Age as far back as 800BC.

The excavation at the David Wilson Homes development has already revealed objects including a sword, shield and 10 spears, as well as more than 360 amber and glass beads, brooches and ancient pots.

A major focus area of the archaeological analysis will concentrate on whether the population is indigenous or migrants from the continent.

The skeletons found are a mixture of men, women and children.

Paula Ware, managing director at MAP Archaeological Practice, said: “To date, the east of Yorkshire has the largest concentration of ‘Arras Culture’ square barrows, and naturally these findings have helped to strengthen this.

“On the whole this is a hugely important discovery and is a fine example of what can be revealed and discovered if house developers and archaeologists work hand-in-hand to reveal the nation’s hidden history.”

David Wilson Homes found the settlement at its Pavilion Square development after it started work in September 2014. The discovery will be officially announced on BBC Four’s Digging for Britain at 8pm tonight.

Peter Morris, development director at David Wilson Homes, said: “These findings are of national significance and could help shape our understanding of the ‘Arras Culture’ and indeed the Iron Age as a whole.

“At present we are still at the early analytical stages of reviewing these findings, however we do understand that this discovery is very rare and of international importance.”

Early medieval Muslim graves discovery in France


Early medieval Muslim grave in Nimes, France

From PLOS ONE:

Early Medieval Muslim Graves in France: First Archaeological, Anthropological and Palaeogenomic Evidence

February 24, 2016

Abstract

The rapid Arab-Islamic conquest during the early Middle Ages led to major political and cultural changes in the Mediterranean world. Although the early medieval Muslim presence in the Iberian Peninsula is now well documented, based in the evaluation of archeological and historical sources, the Muslim expansion in the area north of the Pyrenees has only been documented so far through textual sources or rare archaeological data.

Our study provides the first archaeo-anthropological testimony of the Muslim establishment in the South of France through the multidisciplinary analysis of three graves excavated at Nîmes. First, we argue in favor of burials that followed Islamic rites and then note the presence of a community practicing Muslim traditions in Nîmes.

Second, the radiometric dates obtained from all three human skeletons (between the 7th and the 9th centuries AD) echo historical sources documenting an early Muslim presence in southern Gaul (i.e., the first half of 8th century AD).

Finally, palaeogenomic analyses conducted on the human remains provide arguments in favor of a North African ancestry of the three individuals, at least considering the paternal lineages. Given all of these data, we propose that the skeletons from the Nimes burials belonged to Berbers integrated into the Umayyad army during the Arab expansion in North Africa. Our discovery not only discusses the first anthropological and genetic data concerning the Muslim occupation of the Visigothic territory of Septimania but also highlights the complexity of the relationship between the two communities during this period.

The people in the graves had not been killed in battle, and had been buried carefully.

See also here.

Viking buckle discovery in the Netherlands


The Oudewater viking buckle, photo by Caio Haars

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Viking buckle found in Oudewater

Today, 12:54

Amateur archaeologist Caio Haars from Oudewater found three weeks ago a buckle from the Viking Age, reports RTV Utrecht. He found it with his metal detector.

The buckle is from the 10th to the 12th century. Typical are the inwardly rolled rank ornaments. The lion’s head with outstretched tongue (buckle thorn) was often used in the Nordic art world, especially in sculptures in churches.

The buckle will be exhibited in the town hall of Oudewater. The amateur archaeologist does not say where he made his discovery. He fears that other people will scour the meadows. Farmers may be affected by that, he says.

Dutch medieval counts ate swans and godwits


This video shows black-tailed godwits and marsh sandpipers.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Heron bones, skeletons and child soldier‘s button lay bare Counts’ Courtyard

Today, 16:29

When the counts and countesses [of the medieval county Holland] of the house ‘Die Haghe’ – the current Binnenhof – ate, swans, herons and black-tailed godwits were on the menu. Already in the 12th century there was skating on the Hofvijver. And right next to the existing tram line #1 Stadtholder Prince Maurice in 1620 had a pleasure garden built to find relaxation behind a brick wall with his mistresses.

These are just some suggestive facts from the book Het grafelijke en stadhouderlijke hof Den Haag [The counts’ and stadtholders‘ court in The Hague], which was presented today. The archeology department in The Hague has summarized 300 years of archaeological excavations and that gives a very detailed picture of life around the historic Courtyard, where Count Floris IV about 1230 founded the court Die Haghe. …

One of the most beautiful discoveries according to [archaeologist] Van Veen is a cuff button of a child soldier from the time of [King of Holland, 1806-1810] Louis Bonaparte. Around 1806 boys of about nine years were taken from the orphanages to fight. On the Malieveld field they were taught to handle weapons.

16th century pirate’s skull and bones discovery under Scottish playground


A reconstructed image of what the recently discovered man could have looked like (left) and a digital image of the skull, photo: City of Edinburgh Council

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

Skeleton found under school playground could have belonged to a 16th-century pirate

The school’s headteacher said the pupils thought it was ‘fantastic’ that a pirate skeleton could have been found under their school

Doug Bolton

A human skeleton found under the playground of an Edinburgh school could have once belonged to a 16th-century pirate, archaeologists have said.

The skeleton was found by council workmen at Victoria Primary School in the Newhaven area of Edinburgh, and later carbon dated by experts to the 16th or 17th century.

The school is near Newhaven Harbour, the closest port to Scotland’s capital, which was once the site of a gibbet in which the bodies of executed criminals were displayed as a warning to others.

At first, archaeologists thought the man’s skeleton was from the Bronze Age, due to the poor condition it was found in.

However, further investigation and carbon dating revealed the man had died much more recently. Due to the condition of the skeleton and its proximity to the harbour and gibbet rather than any of the three nearby graveyards, it is believed he was executed, either for piracy or another crime, and displayed in the gibbet before being buried in a shallow, unmarked grave.

The firm which uncovered the skeleton, AOC Archaeology, worked with forensic artist Hayley Fisher to create a reconstruction of the face of the man, who is believed to have been in his fifties when he died.

Laura Thompson, the headteacher of the primary school, said: “The pupils think it’s fantastic that a skeleton was found deep underneath their playground.”

“The archaeologists will hold a special lesson with some of the children about how they have used science to analyse the remains and it will be a good learning opportunity for them.”

Pre-Viking settlement discovery in Norway


A delicate blue glass bead found during the recent dig in Norway. Photo: Age Hojem, NTNU University Museum

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

1,500-year-old Viking settlement discovered underneath Norwegian airport

The site discovered expands across an area roughly the size of 13 football pitches

Will Grice

A 1,500-year-old Viking settlement has been discovered underneath an airport in Norway.

1,500-year-old means 6th century AD. So, well before the Viking age, of Scandinavian attacks in non-Scandinavian countries, is said to begin, about 790 AD. I would call it a pre-Viking settlement, not a Viking settlement.

During expansion work on the Ørland Airport, archaeologists found a plot of ancient land that reportedly to expand across 91,000 square metres – just under the size of 13 football pitches.

Some of the artefacts pulled from the excavation site include jewellery, animal bones and a shard from a green glass goblet.

It is believed the area was inhabited by a fishing community, with a large proportion of the site acting as an Iron Age rubbish tip, known as a midden.

This is the first time materials of this age have been discovered in Norway, with many of the archaeologists believing the remains were in good condition due to the soil in the area having low-acidity.

Historians have long anticipated the area to be rich with ancient artefacts but have previously been unable to excavate it due to government restrictions on archaeological digs.

The law require[s] archaeologists to wait for an opportunity to excavate an area to arise before commencing a dig, meaning the government’s plan to purchase 52 F-35 fighter jets and expand Ørland Airport came at exactly the right time.

Buying expensive warplanes, and especially super-expensive F-35 aka Joint Strike Fighter planes with all their scandals and problems, never comes at the right time. Though this time, it happened to help archaeology. The Iran-Iraq war happened to help leopards. Israeli-Syrian warfare happened to help wolves. That does not make these wars any less bloody and horrible.

“This as a very strategic place,” Ingrid Ystgaard, the dig’s project manager told Ars Technica.

“It was a sheltered area along the Norwegian coastal route from southern Norway to the northern coasts. And it was at the mouth of Trondheim Fjord, which was a vital link to Sweden and the inner regions of mid-Norway.

“Nothing like this has been examined anywhere in Norway before.

“Now our job is to find out what happened here, how people lived. We discover new things every day we are out in the field. It’s amazing.”