Archaeological research in Leiden inner city


This video is called History of the Faculty of Archaeology in Leiden.

Leiden in the Netherlands is quite old. Early in the Middle Ages, there was a burgrave’s castle and a village along the Rhine river. In 1266, it became a city.

During the first months of 2015, there will be digging in the inner city of Leiden, to put underground waste containers in the holes. These underground waste containers replace waste bags which are vulnerable to damage by herring gulls and lesser black-backed gulls nesting in the city.

The digging for the containers is an opportunity for archaelogists. In 26 of the inner city holes, archaeologists will look for new discoveries in Leiden medieval history.

A map of places where there will be archaeological research is here.

Archaeology in Confucius’ hometown in China


This video says about itself:

New Discoveries in Chinese Archaeology

19 May 2009

Features some of the most prolific archeological sites in China, including the burial complex of the First Emperor of China and Sanxingdui.

From the International Institute for Asian Studies in Leiden, the Netherlands:

The following IIAS Lunch Lecture is by Yi WANG. She will talk about the archaeological survey project named “Landscape, Ruins, and Memory: Archaeological Survey in the Wen-Si Region” (2010).

From Landscape to Spectacle: Archaeology in Confucius‘ Hometown

Date & time
20 January 2015, 12.30 – 14.00 hrs

Venue
IIAS, Conference Room, Rapenburg 59, Leiden

The lecture

Qufu city (35°36’ N, 117°02’ E, Shandong province, China), located on the hills area traversed by the Wen and Si rivers, is well known in China as Confucius’ (551~479 BC) hometown, and the purported birthplace of the legendary Yellow Emperor. The lineage of Duke Zhou, who was regarded as the cultural model by Confucius, established Qufu as the capital city of Lu State (11th c. ~ 256 BC). Peaks on this hilly terrain, which used to be treated as indigenous sacred sites during the Bronze Age, later were included as the eastern part into the imperial landscape, e.g. 91 kilometers north to the city, located the Mount Tai, which became one of the major destinations for imperial pilgrimage when the Emperor Qin unified the country (221 BC), then was created as the East Great Mountain in Tang dynasty.

Archaeological sites of Neolithic time and Bronze Age have been found now and then in this area during the past century. Archaeological surveys and excavations focused on the site of capital city of Lu State (11th ~3rd c. BC), in which Confucius used to live, had been operated in 1970s, mapped out the spatial structures and urban settlements of this Bronze age city. In 2010, an intensive archaeological survey project named as Landscape, Ruins, and Memory: Archaeological Survey in the Wen-Si Region was initiated with the aim of locating and recording the distribution of Neolithic, Bronze Age and imperial period archaeological sites in the region and of attempting to understand the dynamic transformations in the historical landscape of this region, particularly how was the ruins of the city and its sacred sites incorporated into the cultural spectacle revolved around its memory. This lecture is going to introduce some initial findings and outcome of the first four years work of this project.

Dr Yi WANG is affiliated fellow of IIAS, and assistant professor at the Institute of History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China.

Unknown ancient Egyptian queen’s grave discovered


This video is called Top 10 Female Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt.

From the BBC:

5 January 2015 Last updated at 10:01 GMT

Queen Khentakawess III‘s tomb found in Egypt

Archaeologists in Egypt have unearthed the tomb of a previously unknown queen, Egyptian officials say.

The tomb was found in Abu-Sir, south-west of Cairo, and is thought to belong to the wife or mother of Pharaoh Neferefre who ruled 4,500 years ago.

Egyptian Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said that her name, Khentakawess, had been found inscribed on a wall in the necropolis.

Mr Damaty added that this would make her Khentakawess III.

The tomb was discovered in Pharaoh Neferefre’s funeral complex.

Miroslav Barta, head of the Czech Institute of Egyptology mission which made the discovery, said that the location of the queen’s tomb made them believe that she was the wife of the pharaoh.

The Czech archaeologists also found about 30 utensils made of limestone and copper.

Mr Damaty explained that the discovery would “help us shed light on certain unknown aspects of the Fifth Dynasty, which along with the Fourth Dynasty, witnessed the construction of the first pyramids.”

Abu-Sir was used as an Old Kingdom cemetery for the ancient Egyptian capital of Memphis.

See also here.