From little girl to reed warbler biologist


This video says about itself:

3 July 2015

A family of Reed Warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus is shown searching for small invertebrates in a reed-bed. The well-grown chicks are old enough to feed themselves and they closely resemble their parents.

Translated from Vroege Vogels radio in the Netherlands today:

Like father like daughter

From her childhood on Anne Kwak was taken by her father [Robert Kwak] to a pond. He was there to count birds, she was there to play, because Anne was not interested in birds. Twenty-five years later they are still there, because Anne now is investigating the reed warbler.

Anne is npw a biologist and employee of the Radboud University in Nijmegen and is doing recently PhD research into the impact of pesticides on populations of reed warblers.

Robert is a biologist and works as head of the conservation department of Birdlife in the Netherlands. He specializes in waterfowl.

North American nesting birds 2015 report


NestWatch Digest cover

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Dear Friend of NestWatch,

We’re excited to kick off another nesting season with you. To get things started, we’re sharing our brand new annual report, the NestWatch Digest. In it, you’ll find data summaries and highlights from the 2015 nesting season. Click here to read the report.

Thank you for your contributions,

The NestWatch team

Black holes colliding, video


This video says about itself:

11 February 2016

The Sound of Two Black Holes Colliding (Edited Longer Version). By LIGO

In Milestone, Scientists Detect Gravitational Waves As Black Holes Collide: here.

Astronomers from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) Collaboration have published the first detection of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of space and time. The announcement comes almost exactly a century after Albert Einstein, in mid-1916, predicted the existence of the waves on the basis of his Theory of General Relativity: here.

Gravitational waves, new discovery


This video says about itself:

LIGO‘s First Detection of Gravitational Waves! | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

11 February 2016

Today, over 100 years after Einstein proposed his theory of general relativity, we are proud to announce that his final major prediction has been verified! Gravitational waves have officially been detected by LIGO! We are still getting details as the teams of physicists go over the data, but this is a huge deal, and is an exciting new step in understanding our universe.

See also here.

Publication about this in Physical Review Letters: here.

Birds of Dutch Nijmegen region on the Internet


This video says about itself:

BTO Bird ID – Skylark & Woodlark

10 June 2015

Lauded by poets for their wonderful, uplifting song, larks are rather nondescript birds when seen. There are two species regularly found in Britain and Ireland and their ranges and habitats do overlap, so how can we tell them apart?

The Dutch ornithologists of Vogelwerkgroep Nijmegen have made a new Internet atlas site about birds in the area around Nijmegen city.

In its English version, you see a list of bird species which live there, or used to live there.

In the Dutch language version, there is much more information. If you click on a bird species’ name, then you get extensive details, including, eg, maps, on how these birds live locally.

Eg, here is the page about woodlarks around Nijmegen.

Flamingos in love, video


This video from England says about itself:

Flamingos Display Best Moves – Animals In Love – BBC

10 February 2016

There are six different species of Flamingo, Liz Bonin visits the Slimbridge Wetlands Centre in the UK to find out more about the greater flamingo. In their efforts to attract a mate they do something no other Flamingo species does…

Chinese crested terns discovery in Indonesia


This 2014 video is called The Bird of Legend: Chinese Crested Tern.

From BirdLife:

Survey confirms Chinese Crested Terns in Indonesia

By Ed Parnell, Tue, 09/02/2016 – 08:45

A survey team led by Burung Indonesia (BirdLife in Indonesia) and BirdLife’s Asia Division has confirmed a wintering site of the globally threatened Chinese Crested Tern Thalasseus bernsteini in eastern Indonesia.

At least one adult and possibly one first-year Chinese Crested Tern were seen in a flock of up to 250 Greater Crested Terns T. bergii near Seram Island (approximately midway between Sulawesi and Papua). Threats to the site and the birds were assessed in detail during the one-week survey that was carried out in mid-January 2016, and the team also visited local university and government institutions to raise awareness of the nearby presence of this Critically Endangered seabird.

Despite its name, the Chinese Crested Tern was first found near Halmahera, in the Wallacea region of eastern Indonesia. However, since its discovery in 1861 the species had not subsequently been recorded in Indonesia (apart from an unverified record in Bali) until December 2010, when a lone bird was photographed near Seram. As a result of this initial sighting (and further reports in 2014/15), BirdLife and Burung Indonesia believed the area to perhaps be a regular wintering site. A survey team was formed, including local conservationists and three university students from Hong Kong.

“Although the number of Chinese Crested Terns found during the survey is low, it does confirm that the species is a regular wintering bird to the Seram Sea, and it is very likely that Wallacea is a main wintering area for this species. As the local authorities and community are starting to be aware of and feel proud of its presence, it will surely only be a matter of time before more sightings are reported from the region,” said Simba Chan, adding that more surveys and outreach work are planned by BirdLife around Seram in the future.

“The involvement of local communities in conservation actions is one of Burung’s main strategies,” added Ria Saryanthi, Head of Communication and Knowledge Center, Burung Indonesia. Burung has been focusing its work in the Wallacea region which includes Sulawesi, the Lesser Sundas and the Moluccas, since it was established in 2002.

It is also hoped that another recent project – in China itself – may help to build more knowledge of this little-known species. In August 2015 some 31 crested tern chicks (probably all Greater Crested Terns, which share the colony with their rarer relatives) were banded at Tiedun Dao, the largest Chinese Crested Tern colony. The birds were ringed with numbered red bands, the first step in a systematic study that aims to investigate the movements of the colony’s terns.

Ocean Park Conservation Foundation (OPCFHK) Foundation Director Ms. Suzanne Gendron said, “The Foundation has been supporting the conservation efforts on Chinese crested terns since 2008.  We are excited to know that after years of efforts, there is a higher hope for the recovery of this critically endangered species. I believe our sponsored students benefit from and are inspired by Mr. Simba Chan’s passion and experience.