British Conservative weekly praises Hitler’s Wehrmacht


This 2011 video says about itself:

War crimes of the WehrmachtHannes Heer

Winner of the prestigious peace award at the Film festival of the independent film in Osnabrück Germany, this documentary investigates the historically very sensitive Nazi raid in the Dutch village of Putten in 1944 that left 700 villagers dead and murdered. After WWII only two of the 1000 involved German soldiers of the infamous second pantzer division had been trialed or convicted. Even today German bureaucracy denies that severe war crimes had taken place in Putten. On the threshold of oblivion investigates the whereabouts of some of the absolved perpetrators and director Ton Verheul tries to interview them.

During Hitler’s 1940-1945 occupation of the Netherlands, German military vehicles rode in the Netherlands. They had signs WH (Wehrmacht Heer=army), WL (Wehrmacht Luftwaffe=air force) or WM (Wehrmacht Marine=navy). Dutch people who did not like the occupation interpreted the abbreviations as WH=Wij Halen (we steal); WL=Wij Liegen (we lie) and WM=Wij Moorden=we murder.

From the Jewish Telegraph Agency:

British Columnist Calls Nazi Troops The Heroes Of D-Day

17 May 2018

A far-right race baiter who works as a columnist for a respected weekly British current affairs magazine

The JTA aricle does not name the magazine. It is The Spectator, closely connected to the governing British Conservative Party.

wrote a piece sympathizing with the Wehrmacht, the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany.

In the column by Taki Theodoracopulos, a Greek writer who lives in London and New York, the author asks readers to feel sorry for the 76,000 Germans, reserve troops who had “not trained in combat,” as they fought against 150,000 British, American and Canadian troops on Normandy Beach on D-Day.

“It might sound strange me writing … from a German perspective, but fair’s fair. I asked my companions which side they’d choose, and all of them agreed that the attacking forces had a better chance of survival than the defenders”, he wrote.

Taki runs his own website publication, Taki’s Magazine, described as a libertarian

‘Libertarian’ used to mean exclusively ‘anarchist’; until the term was stolen by right-wingers who want ‘liberty’ only for the 1% richest people.

webzine of “politics and culture” but which often dabbles in sympathy for the far right. In 1998 he accused Jews of “trafficking in the Holcoaust”, saying their “constant harping on about the Germans seems to be motivated by profit.”

The headline over his D-Day article changed during the day. The first headline read: “In praise of Wehrmacht: The real story of D-Day is the heroism of the German soldiers who were vastly outnumbered but fought nobly and to the death.”

World War I, May 1918


This video about Scotland says about itself:

Striking workers in Glasgow circa 1918. Archive film 99413

World War One billboard poster of Kitchener pointing – “Your Country Needs YOU”. Soldiers marching past the generals during an inspection. Newly-signed up soldiers board trains heading for the frontline, waved off by their wives and children. Women workers in good spirits heading for the factory. Inside the factory where women are doing carpentry. Women at work on the railways and munitions plants. Lloyd George inspects the munitions works and talks to the women there. Lloyd George and Arthur Henderson. Demonstrations or strikes near end of World War One on the homefront in Glasgow, Scotland. Bagpipers lead the victorious soldiers through streets.

By John Ellison in Britain:

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Looking back a century to May 1918

ON MAY 1 1918 Glasgow experienced a massive May Day demonstration. For those taking part, it demonstrated that “patriotic” support for the war (with hundreds of thousands of casualties suffered since the German advance on the Western front had begun on March 21), ceased to be an argument on the table.

Some 90,000 people came on to the streets, bound for Glasgow Green. Speakers from 20 platforms were then heard. The British Socialist Party’s The Call soon afterwards commented: “It was quite plain to all that that great assembly of workers were out for Peace and the overthrow of Capitalism.” There were many shouts for the release of leading socialist agitator John Maclean, then in Duke Street prison, awaiting trial on May 9.

The first of May was also the day of the appeals heard in the London Inner Sessions at Clerkenwell by philosopher Bertrand Russell and peace campaigner and socialist Joan Beauchamp against their February sentences for encouraging “disaffection” in the Tribunal, the organ of the No Conscription Fellowship (NCF).

Russell’s sentence of six months in the “second division” was now upgraded to the privileged regime of the first, while Joan Beauchamp, previously given a fine or three months in prison, now received one month’s jail, having refused to pay the fine. Russell’s sentence was adjusted in the light of his being “a man of great distinction”, unlike, the judicial thinking may have run, the usual riff-raff of anti-conscriptionists.

London’s May Day meeting, unlike Glasgow’s, was to be on Sunday May 5, but was abruptly prohibited by the Home Office.

A year earlier, more than 100,000 people had turned out for the celebration, and another big gathering was expected. But late on May 3, police served notice on the Karl Marx Centenary Committee (comprising the British Socialist Party (BSP), Independent Labour Party and trade union branches etc.) that the meeting and its associated processions were outlawed by the Home Secretary. It had been planned that seven marches would lead into Finsbury Park from different directions, and that fifty speakers would address the crowd from eight platforms.

The ban was promoted by the Daily Express, owned by the present Minister of Information, Lord Beaverbrook. On May 3 it proclaimed: “The peacetime toleration that permitted every addle-pated orator to let off steam is no longer possible. This proposed pacifist orgy is a direct incitement to a breach of the peace. They include however, middle-class pacifists … and various representatives of a mysterious body that calls itself the Karl Marx Centenary Committee.”

There was no mystery about the committee, or about the courage of the people (perhaps a thousand) who braved the ban to gather in Finsbury Park on May 5 to listen to speakers before being dispersed violently by mounted police.

Three miles away, at Highgate Cemetery, another show of defiance took place. A good number of people wishing to take part in a commemorative event at the grave of Karl Marx a century after his birth were prevented from doing so. Eventually the police allowed a deputation to go in to place wreaths on the grave. One wreath was the offering of “ambassador” Maxim Litvinov, who had been refused, like his government, recognition. It carried the inscription “From Russia, the first Socialist Republic, in memory of Karl Marx, who showed the workers of the world the path to self-emancipation.” Litvinov had by now moved with his family from West Hampstead to new rooms at 11 Bigwood Road, Hampstead Garden Suburb, and his BSP-published pamphlet The Bolshevik Revolution: Its Rise and Meaning was available for 1 shilling.

On May 8 two leading members of the NCF were up before the Bow Street beak. These were Lydia Smith, undisclosed editor of the Tribunal, and Violet Tillard (“Tilly”), general secretary. They had refused to give police the address of the printer of the internally circulated NCF News, after the breaking-up and confiscation of the Tribunal printer’s equipment in April. Tilly was singled out, fined heavily, and appealed.

John Maclean’s trial took place on May 9 before judge and jury in Edinburgh. The previous night 30 Scottish socialists had tramped from Glasgow to the trial venue. The charges against him were of sedition, of prejudicing recruiting, and of attempting to cause disaffection, and were based on his recent speeches.

The Times on May 10 solemnly caricatured the prosecution case. “The prisoner advocated ‘downing’ tools, and said that socialists should break all laws. He advised the workers to take control of Glasgow City Chambers, the Post Office, and the banks, and urged that the House of Commons should be superseded by a Soviet, saying that he did not care whether they met in the usual place or at Buckingham Palace.”

If accurate, that would have been sufficiently outlandish to make prosecution ludicrous. Refusing to plead guilty or not guilty, Maclean gave a lengthy speech which newspapers did not care to report. It included, prophetically:

“If one side or the other wins [World War I], then the revenge will come … In view of the fact that the great powers are not prepared to stop the war until the one side or the other is broken down, it is our business as members of the working class to see that this war ceases today, not only to save the lives of the young men of the present, but also to stave off the next great war … I am out for an absolute reconstruction of society, on a co-operative basis, throughout all the world; when we stop the need for armies and navies, we stop the need for war.”

The middle-class jury found him guilty as charged without needing to retire, and the judge found sentencing an easy chore. He was given five years’ penal servitude.

“He is sentenced to this fearful punishment simply for talking”, commented Labour’s George Lansbury-edited Herald.

Within a fortnight the Clyde District Defence Committee was formed to work for Maclean’s release, while Maclean went on hunger strike.

On May 11 the Herald’s front page contained only the words “TERMS OF THE SECRET TREATIES (Special Number)” and inside seven pages were devoted to these deals for distribution of territorial extensions among Allied countries. The editor of the booklet on the treaties which had appeared the previous month, F Seymour Cocks, declared that the Allied governments had declined to speak out on the subject “because their mouths are stopped by the secret agreements … because their voices are choked by the ink and parchment of the shameful treaties they have signed.”

The previous day in Ireland, arrests of Sinn Fein leaders had taken place — of Eamonn de Valera, Arthur Griffith, Constance Markievicz and others, more than a hundred in all. According to Lord French, military viceroy for Ireland, they had been in treasonable communication with the enemy. As to this, the Daily Mail was confident, “there could be no doubt.” In fact those arrested were Irish patriots, interned for their independence activity and for their hostility to the conscription of Irishmen which the government had not yet dared to enforce.

On May 19 the annual conference of the Workers’ Suffrage Federation, which now became the Workers’ Socialist Federation, opened. Besides re-electing Sylvia Pankhurst as secretary, the conference declared its opposition to all war, demanded self-determination for all nations, and the release of John Maclean.

One leading conscription-refuser, at that moment in Liverpool’s jail, was Fenner Brockway, former Labour Leader editor. His decision to break the prison rule of silence was reported in the Herald on May 25. His example was swiftly copied by other COs, and before long he was transferred to Lincoln Prison.

On May 27 came another push of German forces on the Western Front, while large numbers of US troops were arriving to strengthen the Allied side.

Meanwhile, British military intervention in Russia was quietly developing. On May 17 the War Cabinet was informed that a military mission was setting off for Murmansk and Archangel, with a view to recruiting Czech forces for anti-Bolshevik designs in north Russia.

So it was that Britain’s war to keep and extend its empire was now also a war against socialism.

Trump loses even most slavish European NATO fans on Iran deal


This 16 May 2018 video from the USA is called Glenn Greenwald: Is Trump An Aberration?

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Dutch Prime Minister Rutte calls the decision by United States President Trump to withdraw from the Iran deal “crap”. Rutte also recognizes himself in the sharp words of European Union President Donald Tusk about the United States.

Tusk said at the EU summit in the Bulgarian capital Sofia that “after the recent decisions of Donald Trump you can think that you do not need enemies with friends like that“. He also said that if Europe needs help now, then it can only rely on itself.

Prime Minister Rutte agrees.

Mark Rutte is the leader of the VVD party, one of the four party Dutch right-wing government coalition with a one MP majority in parliament. The VVD is traditionally the most pro Big Business, most slavishly pro NATO, most slavishly pro NATO governments’ wars (from the African colonial wars of then fascist Portugal in the 1960s, to Korea to Vietnam to Iraq 2003 to Libya 2011, etc) party in the Netherlands. If even the VVD now disagrees with Trump’s plan for war on Iran, that shows something.

See also here.

EU summit: Anger over Trump hides European tensions: here.

US-EU on collision course: here.

Facing a deepening conflict with the United States, Berlin is massively upgrading its military capacity to enable Germany to use its armed forces to pursue its economic and geo-strategic interests around the world. Chancellor Angela Merkel and Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen made this clear on Monday at the Bundeswehr (Armed Forces) conference in Berlin: here.

US Secretary of State Pompeo presents war ultimatum to Iran: here.

Keith Richards Urges People To ‘Get Rid Of Donald Trump’: here.

Big pro-peace, anti-Trump demonstration, Brussels, 7 July


This 24 May 2017 video from Brussels, Belgium is called Thousands Protest Trump Before NATO Summit.

That 24 May 2017, there was a big demonstration against the militarism and other wrongs of Trump and NATO, organized by the Trump Not Welcome coalition in Belgium.

This year, on 7 July, they will have a similar demonstration, when Trump will probably be at a NATO conference again.

From their Internet site:

Protest March

Make Peace Great Again

7 July 3 PM – Brussels North Station

Trump will probably visit our country on 11 and 12 July for a NATO summit. On the agenda: more defence expenditure by all NATO countries, including Belgium. The Trump Not Welcome Platform calls on everyone to reclaim the streets on Saturday 7 July. We refuse to participate in this arms race at the expense of poverty reduction, social protection, the fight against climate change, humane refugee policies, and a diverse society based on solidarity. Will you join us?

Come to Brussels on Saturday 7 July, and say ‘No’ together with us to Trump, his politics, and that of his European counterparts. Let us jointly give a message:

For peace

Against the purchase of new fighter jets and the militarization that Trump and the NATO want to enforce. We want to invest our tax money in education, health care, the climate, and international solidarity! For a world without nuclear weapons!

For a liveable world

It’s outrageous: lignite plants are reopened, and iodine tablets are distributed to protect us against the cracks in the nuclear power plants. We want a solidarity-based and decisive climate policy for a sustainable future.

For a tolerant society based on solidarity

Racism, sexism, intimidation, criminalization of those who seek refuge from war and of people who open up their houses out of solidarityRights for which the struggle started long ago are under attack. We stand up for the rights of all people, based on the principles of equality and solidarity.

For social rights

For the interests of the 99%. No to the politics of self-enrichment of governments that are governed by and for the richest 1%. We’re fed up with austerity measures. Time to invest in our society.

Join us on Saturday 7 July and let your voice be heard. Let us show that we stand united for a peaceful and sustainable future based on solidarity. United we stand!

Speeches and program to be confirmed.

Meeting point: Railway Station Brussels North at 3 PM