Dutch fungi atlas will be published


Ecological Atlas of mushrooms in Drenthe

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society:

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

On March 13, the mushrooms atlas of Drenthe province will be presented. It is the first time that a book about mushrooms appears written in the Dutch language from an ecological perspective: where does a particular mushroom grow and what does its presence say on the local environment and soil conditions. The Ecologische Atlas van Paddenstoelen in Drenthe will be presented in Zwiggelte (Drenthe).

The eight-kilogram atlas was compiled by professional and amateur mycologists with good reputations at home and abroad. The atlas has 1.700 pages and consists of three parts. Due to the size and the significant and sustained efforts which underlie it, this atlas is already called by some “the mother of all atlases”.

Cauliflower mushrooms, not anti-dog poison


This video says about itself:

We find a Cauliflower mushroom ! (Sparassis crispa)

18 September 2014

My son was raised in the forests helping wild-craft edible mushrooms. Every year we find at least one Cauliflower – the first ending up in a bread casserole with chanterelles.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands (they put the wrong photo with their new item; not of a cauliflower fungus, but of a coral fungus):

Baked sponges in Huizen turn out to be cauliflower mushrooms

Today, 11:33

The suspect sponges that were recently found among bushes in Huizen turn out to be actually fungi. That is the conclusion of investigations by the police and the Forestry Commission.

The finder guessed that they were baked sponges and that they were intended to kill dogs.

According to the Forestry Commission in Huizen, these are innocent fungi which normally grow deep in the forest. They are harmless to dogs because the animals do not like eating the fungi. …

The past few days came from different towns alerts about baked sponges supposedly deposited by people who hate dogs.

The sponges are baked in fat and smell good for dogs and cats. But once inside the stomachs of the animals they will expand and they can be lethal.

Except in Huizen sponges were also found in Almere, Hengelo, The Hague, Leiden and Saendelft. It is still unclear whether the sponges in these other places will also prove to be cauliflower mushrooms.

The plant family Corsiaceae, new research


This video is called Liliaceae plant family, description, examples, info.

From the Journal of Biogeography:

Ancient Gondwana break-up explains the distribution of the mycoheterotrophic family Corsiaceae (Liliales)

19 FEB 2015

Abstract

Aim

Many plant families have a disjunct distribution across the southern Pacific Ocean, including the mycoheterotrophic family Corsiaceae, which provides a prime example of this biogeographical pattern. A better grasp of the family’s evolutionary relationships is needed to understand its historical biogeography. We therefore aimed to (1) test the uncertain monophyly of Corsiaceae, (2) define its phylogenetic position, and (3) estimate divergence times for the family, allowing us to assess whether the distribution of the family is the result of vicariance.

Location

Southern South America and Australasia.

Methods

We analysed various combinations of mitochondrial and nuclear data to address the monophyly, phylogenetic position and age of Corsiaceae. To test its monophyly, we used a three-locus data set including most monocot orders, and to infer its exact phylogenetic position, we used a five-locus extended data set. We corroborated these findings using an independent plastome dataset. We then used a two-locus dataset with taxa from all monocot orders, and a three-locus dataset containing only taxa of Liliales, to estimate divergence times using a fossil-calibrated uncorrelated lognormal relaxed-clock approach.

Results

Corsiaceae is a monophyletic family and the sister group of Campynemataceae. This clade is the sister group of all other Liliales. The crown age of Corsiaceae is estimated to be 53 Ma (95% confidence interval 30–76 Ma).

Main conclusions

Corsiaceae is an ancient family of mycoheterotrophic plants, whose crown age overlaps with the plate-tectonic split of Gondwana, consistent with a vicariance-based explanation for its current distribution.

See also here.

British spring flowers, cuckoos coming


This video says about itself:

Solitary bee foraging on Crocus tomasinianus ‘Ruby Giant’

1 March 2015

See how the small bee is moving around the anthers to collect pollen as well as diving its head down the base for nectar. Honeybees differ in that they will only collect either pollen or nectar. The bee was on the flower for a much longer time than a honeybee would have been.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

From carpets of crocuses to cuckoos on the move, spring is truly springing

Michael McCarthy

Monday 2 March 2015

Well it’s been a long wait, but spring is here now, at least by the Met Office definition, which classifies the new season as consisting of March, April and May (the older, astronomical definition has it beginning from the vernal equinox, which this year is 20 March, but we tend to go with the Met Office these days). And with Sunday being the first day of it, I went out to look for signs, and was not disappointed.

In Kew Gardens at the moment you can see what must be one of the most vivid springtime displays in the whole country: millions of blooms of early crocuses which are forming vast mauve sheets over the ground. The flower is Crocus tomasinianus, originally from eastern Europe, and in English sometimes called Whitewell purple. From a distance, the massed ranks of the blooms seem to glow, to shine like pale-purple light in the grass. It’s an astonishing spectacle.

The rest of Kew is still a bit bare, but the snowdrops are proudly out in the bluebell wood and there are subtler signs of the new season: the black-headed gulls on the lake are resplendent in their shiny new chocolate-brown headgear (which in winter shrinks to just a dark dot behind the eye), and the dunnocks, those nondescript but subtly attractive birds which we used to call hedge sparrows, are everywhere reeling out their song, which some people say is like the sound of a squeaking shopping trolley: streedly-streedly-streedly-stree.

Yet the most interesting sign of spring greeted me when I got back and switched on the computer: it was an email from the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) giving the latest details of the BTO cuckoos in Africa. Since 2011, Britain’s leading bird research organisation has been satellite-tracking cuckoos on their mammoth migratory journeys from Britain to their African wintering grounds, and the project has revealed a wonderful wealth of hitherto unknown information: where wintering British cuckoos end up (the Congo rainforest), how they get there (some via Italy, some via Spain) and how they return (all of them via West Africa).

The journeys are arduous and full of risk, and sometimes the birds don’t make it: Indy, the cuckoo sponsored by The Independent, died in Cameroon in 2012. Currently 13 cuckoos are being tracked in Africa, including Chris (named after the naturalist Chris Packham) who has been going strong since 2011, and is thus being tracked on his fourth successive Africa trip; and what the BTO email told me was the heartening news that all of the birds are now on their way back, and heading northwards. There’s our spring down in Africa, flying steadily towards us.

They’ll be here in about six weeks, and when they arrive, their two-note musical call is the most instantly recognisable of all our springtime sounds. But the cuckoo, of course, has a double identity: it is not just the supreme spring-announcer, it is a notorious cheat, laying its eggs in the nests of other birds, (the technical term is a brood parasite).

Have you ever wondered how it does it? I mean, how it manages to get its single egg into the nests of its host species, such as reed warblers, meadow pipits and pied wagtails, where the cuckoo chick throws out the other eggs or nestlings and ends up as a monstrous intruder many times the size of the hapless foster-parents who are straining to feed it?

A new book tells in mesmerising detail how the host birds are first outwitted by the female cuckoo, and then by the cuckoo chick. Cuckoo – Cheating By Nature (Bloomsbury, £16.99) is by Nick Davies, the world expert on Cuculus canorus, the Eurasian cuckoo, our bird. He gives a riveting account not only of how the cuckoo evolves deceptive stratagems, such as eggs which mimic the eggs of the host, but also of how the host birds evolve defences, such as learning to reject any eggs which seems slightly different from their own.

This is in effect an “evolutionary arms race” and its complexities are elucidated with exemplary clarity and humour by Professor Davies, who is Professor of Behavioural Ecology at Cambridge and has spent the past 30 years studying cuckoos and discovering their tricks, at Wicken Fen to the north of the city. (He also, for good measure, discovered, through studies in the Cambridge Botanical Garden, that the humble and unglamorous dunnock, mentioned above, has the raciest sex life of any small songbird, everywhere looking for lurve).

His new cuckoo study, which is published next week, is an even more fascinating take on curious behaviour. I’ve just read it, and it’s a terrific read.

Save British seagrass meadows


This video from the Red Sea in Egypt is called Green seahorse in sea grass.

From Wildlife Extra:

Government urged to consider important UK seagrass areas

A newly formed NGO has responded in the consultation process to establish the next tranche of Marina Conservation Zones (MCZs).

Project Seagrass is comprised of internationally recognised experts in seagrass ecology and management.

There is an expanding body of literature illustrating how UK seagrass meadows play a significant role in supporting coastal biodiversity and fisheries productivity.

Seagrass meadows cycle nutrients, provide nursery habitat for young fish, are key foraging grounds for adult fish, prevent beach erosion, support human wellbeing, and harbour culturally significant species, such as seahorses.

Fish growing up in a seagrass meadow will have higher chances of reaching maturity and spawning a new generation than those in an alternative low quality nursery habitat such as bare sand.

However, the group says that UK seagrass meadows are under extreme pressure.

As primary producers living in sheltered coastal waters they are subjected to the problems associated with poor water quality and limited catchment management.

Anything that reduces light availability within the water column will result in stress to these plants.

This is compounded by other physical stressors such as anchor and mooring damage, destructive fishing practices such as bottom trawling, raking and bait digging, and coastal development eroding the long-term resilience of the seagrass systems.

Project Seagrass maintains that providing appropriate and widespread protection for these habitats has never been more urgent.

In a 2013 Swansea University survey throughout the British Isles only two important seagrass sites were found not to have been impacted by poor water quality.

Additional studies utilising GoogleEarth and site visits have revealed the extent of the threats imposed by the impact of inappropriate mooring damage on seagrass meadows throughout the UK.

Examples of the degradation that current mooring practice causes can be seen at Studland Bay, Poole Harbour, Salcombe and around the Isle of Wight.

In the new round of proposed MCZs, the seagrass meadows at Nettle and Mount Bay are included but, the group says, neither is extensive nor particularly threatened.

Adding protection to both of these sites may help in the long-term but is unlikely to have any immediate effect on their management or conservation; effectively these sites are ‘easy wins’ for MCZ creation as neither spots have particular value for alternative uses.

By contrast, seagrass meadows surrounding the North and East of the Isle of Wight and throughout the Solent are under extreme pressure, says the Project, and these have not been included.

The pressure is due to the cumulative impacts of poor water quality, boat use (anchor and mooring damage) and destructive fishing practices (bottom trawling, raking, bait digging).

In addition, seagrass meadows in many other areas of the south English coast, for example Studland Bay, are also under pressure from boat use (moorings and anchors) and, again, not included in the current MCZ proposals.

Project Seagrass says there exists sufficient scientific evidence for the long term protection of all seagrass meadows in the UK.

It has requested as part of its submission that DEFRA reconsider its exclusion of Bembridge, Norris to Ryde, Studland, and Yarmouth to Cowes from the 2nd tranche of MCZs.

Meadows in need of immediate action such as Bembridge, Norris to Ryde, Studland, and Yarmouth to Cowes must be included as MCZs, it says.

For more information visit www.projectseagrass.org.

New moss species discovery in the Netherlands


Orthotrichum comosum

This is an Orthotrichum comosum photo by Rafael Medina in Spain.

Translated from Dutch VARA radio and the Dutch Bryological and Lichenological Society:

Sunday, February 22, 2015

In the center of Hilversum a new moss species has been discovered: Orthotrichum comosum. Never before seen in Western Europe and even worldwide it still is a novice. On Vroege Vogels Radio Henk Siebel of the Bryologische and Lichenologische Werkgroep revealed this unique find. Recently there was a scientific publication on this new moss species. Siebel believed he recognized the moss which he had photographed half a year earlier on a Norway maple in his hometown Hilversum. An interesting finding because the species occurs mainly in Mediterranean mountain areas. It is suspected that climate change now in the Netherlands is creating the right conditions for this species.

Great spotted woodpecker on tombstone and flowers


Great tit, 15 February 2015

This photo shows a great tit, this afternoon at the cemetery.

It was a sunny, but coldish day.

Nuthatch sounds.

Great spotted woodpecker, 15 February 2015

A female great spotted woodpecker on a tombstone. Usually, these birds sit on trees, not on tombstones, even at this cemetery.

Jay, 15 February 2015

On another tombstone, a jay. A less unusual sight.

Blackbird male, 15 February 2015

Between the graves, a male blackbird.

Chaffinch male, 15 February 2015

And a male chaffinch.

Crocus flowers , cemetery, 15 February 2015

Crocus flowers on, and between graves.

Snowdrops, 15 February 2015

A bit further, snowdrops.

While a dunnock sang.