Swans and botanical garden flowers


Mute swan, 18 February 2017

On 18 February 2017, we went to the botanical garden. Before arriving there, we passed a canal with this young mute swan swimming.

Mute swans, 18 February 2017

There were two more mute swans: another youngster and an adult.

Mute swan youngster, 18 February 2017

On the canal bank, feral pigeons.

When we arrived at the botanical garden, there were of course not yet as many flowers as later in the year, it officially still being winter. Yet, already purple crocus.

Winter aconites, 18 February 2017

And quite some winter aconites were already present.

Wintersweet, 18 February 2017

And so were these wintersweet flowers.

Snowdrops, 18 February 2017

And, of course, snowdrops, as one might expect at this time of the year.

Snowdrops on 18 February 2017

A great tit calls. Blackbirds. Ring-necked parakeets.

On the other side of the canal, grazing coots and moorhens.

A blue tit drinking from the botanical garden stream.

Snowmen, parakeets and blackbirds


Snow on plants, 12 February 2017

Today, a snowy day, we went to the botanical garden. Much snow on our way, eg, on these plants.

Snowman, 12 February 2017

When we had nearly arrived at the botanical garden, this snowman. His nose was a carrot, like traditionally with snowmen. However, his eyes were untraditional: Coca-Cola bottle caps.

Yesterday, on a park bench, we had seen another snowman (with a snowchild next to him); with Amstel beer bottle caps as eyes. Snowmen’s eyes used to be coal. However, now there is no longer coal in most homes.

After this photo, the battery of the cell phone was empty. So, no more photos today.

A pity, as in the botanical garden there was lots of beautiful snow on branches. Green ring-necked parakeets on snowy white branches. Blackbirds in the snow, and more.

At the astronomical observatory, someone tried to make a snow telescope. However, that turned out to be not easy.

Mexican bats and tequila


This video says about itself:

27 January 2017

As a nectar feeder, the lesser long-nosed bat follows the trail of cactus blooms between Mexico and the U.S. One of the plants it also plays a major role in pollinating is agave, which gives us tequila.

Red squirrel eats fungi


This 3 February 2017 shows a red squirrel eating fungi growing on a tree. Red squirrels may also hoard fungi for food during winter.

Jangb from the Netherlands made this video.

Cattle, birds and hawthorn berries


This 25 January 2017 video shows that in winter in the Netherlands, hawthorn berries are important as food for various animals.

Galloway cattle eat them.

So do birds, like blackbirds, fieldfares and redwings.

Birds and trees in Africa


This December 2016 video, by Danielle van Oijen from the Netherlands, is about the importance of trees for wintering birds and people in Mali, Africa.

Birds, fungi in nature reserve


This autumn 2016 video is about Dutch nature reserve Huys te Warmont.

Including birds, like ring-necked parakeet, great spotted woodpecker, short-toed treeceeper and starlings.

And fungi, like bearded tooth mushroom.