Unknown ancient Egyptian queen’s grave discovered


This video is called Top 10 Female Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt.

From the BBC:

5 January 2015 Last updated at 10:01 GMT

Queen Khentakawess III‘s tomb found in Egypt

Archaeologists in Egypt have unearthed the tomb of a previously unknown queen, Egyptian officials say.

The tomb was found in Abu-Sir, south-west of Cairo, and is thought to belong to the wife or mother of Pharaoh Neferefre who ruled 4,500 years ago.

Egyptian Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said that her name, Khentakawess, had been found inscribed on a wall in the necropolis.

Mr Damaty added that this would make her Khentakawess III.

The tomb was discovered in Pharaoh Neferefre’s funeral complex.

Miroslav Barta, head of the Czech Institute of Egyptology mission which made the discovery, said that the location of the queen’s tomb made them believe that she was the wife of the pharaoh.

The Czech archaeologists also found about 30 utensils made of limestone and copper.

Mr Damaty explained that the discovery would “help us shed light on certain unknown aspects of the Fifth Dynasty, which along with the Fourth Dynasty, witnessed the construction of the first pyramids.”

Abu-Sir was used as an Old Kingdom cemetery for the ancient Egyptian capital of Memphis.

See also here.

New Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, new film


This is a list of videos about the Dutch documentary film The New Rijksmuseum, by director Oeke Hoogendijk.

I saw this film on 27 December 2014.

It is about the well-known historical and visual arts museum in Amsterdam. Most of it was closed in 2003 for reconstruction. It was supposed to re-open in 2008. However, re-opening was delayed until 2013.

Here is the English language trailer of the film.

A review of the film is here. Another review is here.

The film records the long, difficult process of demolition of many of the old museum building structures, and of reconstruction, and of bringing back the art objects. Not all artifacts, as the museum’s collection has a million objects and not all of them can be on show.

People made new discoveries in the collection while the museum was closed. They found an antler of a moose (or elk, in British English) which so far had led an inconspicuous life on a museum depot shelf. It turned out to be about a thousand years old. It was from the chapel of Emperor Louis the Pious. Engravers had made it a beautiful visual art object.

Quite some time in the film is about a conflict between the Spanish architects of the museum reconstruction and local Amsterdam cyclists. Ever since the museum’s  original 1885 design, cyclists had been able to pass underneath it. That cycle track was and is public property, not museum property. The architects had difficulty in understanding how important that was for local people. Finally, the cyclists won on this. I think the film tends to be too unsympathetic to the cyclists’ legitimate issue.

Rare mushrooms found on old Dutch fortresses


This video is about fungi.

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society:

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

During an excursion by a Dutch waxcap study group on the ground layer of a fortress belonging to the Defence Line of Amsterdam many very rare bitter waxcaps were discovered. They spoke about hundreds of specimens. Such a number is unique both for the Netherlands and abroad.

Besides the bitter waxcaps there were even more unusual species on the fortresses like Hygrocybe fornicata, Hygrocybe quieta, scarlet hood, Hygrocybe irrigata, butter waxcap, Hygrocybe insipida and masses copies of Hygrocybe psittacina.

Red-legged partridge and little owl near Spanish castle


Montearagón castle, 2 November 2014

After 1 November came 2 November 2014 in Aragon, Spain. We went to the surroundings of Montearagón castle, not far from Huesca town.

In 1094, Christian king Sancho Ramirez of Aragon had Montearagón castle built, to help with his plans to conquer Islamic Huesca. Later, it became a monastery. Now, it is a ruin.

A kestrel on a pole.

On a rock, a Thekla lark. This species was named by German zoologist Alfred Edmund Brehm in 1857 for his sister Thekla Brehm, who had died recently, only 24 years old.

A stonechat.

Rock sparrows on a wire.

A little owl, resting on a rock.

On another rock, a black wheatear cleanses its feathers.

Crag martins flying around.

A raven flying.

Closer to the ground, a Dartford warbler in a bush.

Zitting cisticola, 2 November 2014

A zitting cisticola on another bush.

Zitting cisticola, on 2 November 2014

Common linnets.

Red-legged partridge, 2 November 2014

A beautiful red-legged partridge.

Near Montearagón castle, view, 2 November 2014

Near the castle ruin, a griffon vulture flies.

Rock face near Riglos, 2 November 2014

We continue to another part of the Sierra de Guara mountains, around Riglos village.

Rock face near Riglos, on 2 November 2014

Near Riglos there are many steep rock faces, attracting much mountaineering tourism. Some of the people who used to climb here have died on the still more difficult north face of the Eiger mountain in Switzerland.

Riglos church, 2 November 2014

House sparrow male in Riglos, 2 November 2014

House sparrows live in Riglos. We want to see if there are also less common birds around here.