Popes John Paul, Benedict child abuse cover-up


This 10 November 2020 video from the USA says about itself:

Popes Knew Of Misconduct Allegations Against Ex-Cardinal McCarrick, Vatican Finds | TODAY

The Vatican has released its long-awaited report on former American cardinal Theodore McCarrick, who was expelled from the priesthood for sexual misconduct. NBC’s Anne Thompson reports for TODAY.

Translated from Dutch NOS radio today:

The previous two popes ignored complaints of abuse by a cardinal

Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict, the predecessors of the current Pope, have ignored or downplayed complaints of sexual abuse against US American Cardinal Theodore McCarrick. That is stated in a report from the Vatican. Pope Francis ordered the investigation into whether complaints about the cardinal have been covered up.

The investigation shows that in 2000, Pope John Paul II knew that accusations against McCarrick had been made to the Holy See. According to anonymous letters, the American cardinal was guilty of, eg, the sexual abuse of underage family members. Investigators also found that the Vatican received additional information on previous allegations in April 2005, shortly after Pope Benedict XVI took office.

McCarrick was instructed to remain somewhat in the background, according to the report. Benedict thought no further steps were necessary.

Deprived of priestly status

McCarrick retired in 2006. In 2018, Pope Francis stripped him of priestly status for sexual abuse. American bishops and other representatives of the Vatican have also been guilty of ignoring or downplaying reports of McCarrick sexual abuse, the investigation shows.

Glow-in-the-dark platypus, new research


This August 2020 video from Australia says about itself:

Platypus: The King of Weirdos

In the finale of Season 4 of Animalogic, Danielle ventures into Victoria’s Otway ranges in search of a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma; the Platypus.

This episode was shot earlier this year before the mandatory lock down.

From ScienceDaily:

Shining a (UV) light on the glow-in-the-dark platypus

Biofluorescent fur could help some mammals spot each other after dark

October 29, 2020

The fur of the platypus — an Australian species threatened with extinction — glows green under ultraviolet light, a new study finds. This is the first observation of biofluorescence in an egg-laying mammal (monotreme), suggesting this extraordinary trait may not be as rare as previously thought.

The research article “Biofluorescence in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)” was published in De Gruyter’s international journal Mammalia.

Two mammals — the opossum and the flying squirrel — are already known to have fur that biofluoresces under ultraviolet (UV) light.

One of the paper’s authors discovered pink biofluorescence in flying squirrels by accident while conducting a night survey for lichens, a finding reported in an earlier paper. While confirming this field observation with preserved museum specimens, the researchers decided to examine the platypuses in the next drawer along too.

They studied three museum platypus specimens: a female and a male from the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago and another male specimen from the University of Nebraska State Museum.

In visible light, the fur of all three platypus specimens was uniformly brown. But under UV light they appeared green or cyan. The fur of the platypus absorbs UV (wavelengths of 200-400 nanometers) and re-emits visible light (of 500-600 nanometers), making it fluoresce.

Like the marsupial opossum and the placental flying squirrel, platypuses are most active during the night and at dawn and dusk. It may be that these mammals — and possibly others — developed biofluorescence to adapt to low light conditions. The researchers suggest this may be a way for platypuses to see and interact with each other in the dark.

The researchers would now like to work with an Australian team to observe biofluorescence in wild animals. And with colleagues at Northland College and Colorado State University, they are working on a project to further explore the phenomenon across the mammalian family tree.

“It was a mix of serendipity and curiosity that led us to shine a UV light on the platypuses at the Field Museum,” said lead author Professor Paula Spaeth Anich, Associate Professor of Biology and Natural Resources at Northland College. “But we were also interested in seeing how deep in the mammalian tree the trait of biofluorescent fur went. It’s thought that monotremes branched off the marsupial-placental lineage more than 150 million years ago. So, it was intriguing to see that animals that were such distant relatives also had biofluorescent fur.”