War criminal Tony Blair also coronavirus spreader


This 30 July 2020 video says about itself:

As European countries expand protection measures like quarantines and mask-wearing for Covid-19 patients, courts are being left with the job of interpreting and enforcing the new laws. In Austria, a woman has been sentenced to a suspended jail term for visiting a supermarket while under quarantine – a move the judge slammed as ‘dangerous’.

Translated from Dutch NOS radio today:

British former Prime Minister Tony Blair has discredited himself by allegedly violating the coronavirus rules. According to The Sunday Times, he did not go into home quarantine after a two-day trip to the United States. People entering Great Britain from that country are required to go into isolation for two weeks.

The newspaper says it has photos of Blair showing him leaving a London restaurant ten days after his return from Washington. The Sunday Times reports that Blair filed for an exemption but was not granted it.

Why is this war criminal, responsible for killing over a million Iraqis, many Afghans, etc. not yet in a prison cell in The Hague? Why can he fly to the USA, world coronavirus epicentre ‘thanks’ to Donald Trump, and fly back to Britain, bringing the virus with him? Are war criminal politicians only put on trial in The Hague if they are black Africans?

New pterosaur species discovery in Morocco


This 16 October 2020 video, in Vietnamese, is about the discovery of the new pterosaur species Leptostomia begaaensis.

From the University of Portsmouth in England:

Beak bone reveals pterosaur like no other

October 14, 2020

A new species of small pterosaur — similar in size to a turkey — has been discovered, which is unlike any other pterosaur seen before due to its long slender toothless beak.

The fossilised piece of beak was a surprising find and was initially assumed to be part of the fin spine of a fish, but a team of palaeontologists from the universities of Portsmouth and Bath spotted the unusual texture of the bone — seen only in pterosaurs — and realised it was a piece of beak.

Professor David Martill of the University of Portsmouth, who co-authored the study, said: “We’ve never seen anything like this little pterosaur before. The bizarre shape of the beak was so unique, at first the fossils weren’t recognised as a pterosaur.”

Careful searching of the late Cretaceous Kem Kem strata of Morocco, where this particular bone was found, revealed additional fossils of the animal, which led to the team concluding it was a new species with a long, skinny beak, like that of a Kiwi. …

The new species, Leptostomia begaaensis, used its beak to probe dirt and mud for hidden prey, hunting like present-day sandpipers or kiwis to find worms, crustaceans, and perhaps even small hard-shelled clams. …

Dr Nick Longrich, from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, said: “Leptostomia may actually have been a fairly common pterosaur, but it’s so strange — people have probably been finding bits of this beast for years, but we didn’t know what they were until now.”

Long, slender beaks evolved in many modern birds. Those most similar to Leptostomia are probing birds — like sandpipers, kiwis, curlews, ibises and hoopoes. Some of these birds forage in earth for earthworms while others forage along beaches and tidal flats, feeding on bristle worms, fiddler crabs, and small clams.

“Pterosaur fossils typically preserve in watery settings — seas, lakes, and lagoons — because water carries sediments to bury bones. Pterosaurs flying over water to hunt for fish tend to fall in and die, so they’re common as fossils. Pterosaurs hunting along the margins of the water will preserve more rarely, and many from inland habitats may never preserve as fossils at all.

“There’s a similar pattern in birds. If all we had of birds was their fossils, we’d probably think that birds were mostly aquatic things like penguins, puffins, ducks and albatrosses. Even though they’re a minority of the species, their fossil record is a lot better than for land birds like hummingbirds, hawks, and ostriches.”

Over time, more and more species of pterosaurs with diverse lifestyles have been discovered. That trend, the new pterosaur suggests, is likely to continue.

The paper was published today in Cretaceous Research.