White Riot, new film on Rock Against Racism


This 14 October 2019 video from England says about itself:

Director Rubika Shah interview on White Riot and winning the London Film Festival documentary competition 2019

Interviewer: Cristiana Ferrauti
Video: Marta Starczynowska
Editor: Filippo L’Astorina

This film is about the Rock Against Racism movement in Britain in the late 1970s; in which many fans of punk rock, ska and reggae music together stopped the nazi National Front party.

How black-naped terns survive typhoons


This 2016 video is about a black-naped tern nest in the maldives.

From the Research Organization of Information and Systems in Japan:

Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons

August 27, 2020

Six black-naped terns — a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans — have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons.

The research team based in Japan published their analysis on May 30 in Marine Biology, a Springer journal.

“Our goal was to examine the migration characteristics of the black-naped terns from the Okinawa Islands,” said paper author Jean-Baptiste Thiebot, project researcher at the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) in Japan. “The bird is listed as vulnerable by Japan’s Ministry of Environment.”

Thiebot and the team were specifically interested in finding where the birds spend their winters and how they manage to cross the Philippine Sea. The body of water lays just south of Japan, covering an area of two million square miles that suffers from frequent and strong typhoons.

“The birds have to cross the Philippine Sea during the peak of typhoon season,” Thiebot said.

The birds nest near Okinawa in mid-May, lay their eggs in June, and the hatchlings are ready to leave the nest near the end of August. The adults then spend September traveling to their wintering sites south of the Philippine Sea — but, it appears the time and path of travel depends on typhoon season.

The researchers outfitted a total of 20 terns with geographic logging trackers in 2012 and 2017. Of those 20, the researchers were able to collect movement data from two terns from 2012 to 2014 and from four birds from 2017 to 2018.

“The two birds tracked in years of medium-high typhoon activity from 2012 to 2014 seemed to target a stopover area in the northern Philippines several days after a typhoon hit,” Thiebot said. “By contrast, in 2017, no strong typhoon hit in August, and the four study birds departed 23.8 days later, but moved significantly quicker with little or no stopover.”

Despite when they left the breeding grounds, the birds always arrived in the Indonesian islands south of the Philippine Sea within four days of October 1.

“The terns seemed to adjust the timing and path of their migration according to the level of typhoon activity,” Thiebot said. “It is likely that terns respond to the typhoon activity because the storms modify the birds’ feeding conditions at the water surface.”

The terns may use environmental cues, such as the low infrasound storms emit, to time their migration, according to Thiebot. The researchers plan to record the infrasound levels at the breeding area to test this hypothesis, and they hope to further study the terns’ migration across years of typhoon activity to refine their understanding.

This work was supported by the ‘Monitoring Sites 1000 Project’ of the Ministry of the Environment, and it was funded by the Suntory Fund for Bird Conservation (2017-19) and Bird Migration Research Center, Yamashina Institute for Ornithology in 2012.

Other contributors include Noboru Nakamura, Naoki Tomita and project leader Kiyoaki Ozaki, all of whom are affiliated with the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology; and Yutaka Toguchi of Koboh Ryukyurobin.

Trump accepts American neonazi support


This 13 January 2020 video from the USA says about itself:

Aryan Nations gang member who shot police officer captured

Ronnie Lucas Wilson was arrested at an abandoned home early Saturday.

Read more here.

Trump campaign has accepted at least $2,000 from leader of neo-Nazi group ‘Aryan Nations’.

African elephant trails, new research


This 2017 video is called Africa’s Elephant Kingdom HD.

From Purdue University in the USA:

Following African elephant trails to approach conservation differently

August 31, 2020

Elephant trails may lead the way to better conservation approaches.

“Think of elephants as engineers of the forests,” said Melissa J. Remis, professor and head of anthropology at Purdue University, who is best known for her work in ecology and behavior of western gorillas and their ecosystems. “Elephants shape the landscape in many ways that benefit humans. We’re talking thousands of miles of trails. If we think about the loss of elephants over time, then we will see the forest structure change and human activities also would shift.”

These massive creatures trample thick vegetation through dense forests in the Central African Republic’s Congo Basin as they move from the forests’ fruit trees to more open water sources where they hydrate, bathe and socialize. African forest elephants, highly sociable animals, travel in small family groups to meet others at these muddy water sources, which are full of rich minerals that they can’t find in the forests. By clearing routes to these destinations, elephants have created a very complex network of roads that residents, tourists, scientists and loggers still use today. If elephant populations decline, the forest grows over the trails.

“The fabric and way of life of local communities, and even for the industries and conservation organizations that exist in African forests, have largely been shaped by elephant landscape design,” said Carolyn A. Jost Robinson, a former Purdue doctoral student and current visiting scholar who also is director of sociocultural research and engagement at the nonprofit Chengeta Wildlife. “People rely on these elephant highways, and they also are invaluable at understanding and explaining the networks.”

Remis and Jost Robinson focus on these massive trail networks and the ecosystem and local foraging community, called the BaAka, as they evaluate how biological anthropology plays a role in conservation. Their research is specific to the elephant trails leading to Dzanga Saline, a famous forest clearing with a large water source in the Congo area. Their findings are published online in American Anthropologist.

“Anthropologists are very famous for critiquing conservation but not always for coming up with effective solutions,” Remis said. “The area of conservation is dominated by biological sciences, and you can’t make change just tending to ecosystems. Conservation messages focus on flagship species, like elephants, and rarely do they consider the knowledge or needs of people relying on or living with those species. Attention on both could help further conservation and human rights issues.”

Framing the big picture

More than 30 years ago, Purdue University’s Melissa Remis visited the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas for the first time as a biological anthropologist to study gorillas. She became known as the gorilla lady as she visited the site dozens of times. Her fieldwork showed her that to know and study the gorillas, she had to learn about the forest and other wildlife from the local residents who share the land for food, shelter and medicines. Now Remis’ work focuses on the big picture — how the effects of conservation affect people, and what role biological anthropology can play.

“We’re broadening the conversation about conservation,” said Jost Robinson, who became known as the child of the gorilla lady by local residents at their African research site. “When you see a picture in a magazine story about ivory trafficking and elephant hunting, it is unlikely that the article will capture the entire experience of the community, as well as tourists, researchers and companies with local interests. As part of this change — whether you want to talk about climate change, forest access or wildlife protection — these relationships have evolved and taken on new shapes. We looked back on years of data and stories and realized there was a story to tell.”

By focusing on the local BaAka community, especially the hunters known as tuma, the scientists capture information from local residents about interaction and living with elephants that is usually not a part of conservation plans.

“We want this to be a model for showing how to get additional insights when addressing how to conserve forests in better collaboration with those people who rely on them for cultural and material sustenance,” Remis said. “Being able to tell their stories and share their deep knowledge about the area, and what closing off an elephant trail or part of the forest can due to cut off access to food, medicines or social networks, is usually not part of the conservation approach. We need to hear the BaAka in their own words.”