Stingless bee honey is healthy, new research


This August 2018 video is called Stingless bee honey harvest 🐝

From the University of Queensland in Australia:

Science sweetens stingless bee species honey health claims

July 22, 2020

Summary: Examination of honey from five different stingless bee species across Neotropical and Indo-Australian regions has enabled for the first time the identification of the unusual disaccharide trehalulose as a major component representing between 13 and 44 g per 100 g of each of these honeys. The previously unrecognized abundance of trehalulose in stingless bee honeys is concrete evidence that supports some of the reported health attributes of this product.

Science has validated Indigenous wisdom by identifying a rare, healthy sugar in native stingless bee honey that is not found in any other food.

University of Queensland organic chemist Associate Professor Mary Fletcher said Indigenous peoples had long known that native stingless bee honey had special health properties.

“We tested honey from two Australian native stingless bee species, two in Malaysia and one in Brazil and found that up to 85 per cent of their sugar is trehalulose, not maltose as previously thought,” she said.

Dr Fletcher said trehalulose was a rare sugar with a low glycaemic index (GI), and not found as a major component in any other foods.

“Traditionally it has been thought that stingless bee honey was good for diabetes and now we know why — having a lower GI means it takes longer for the sugar to be absorbed into the bloodstream, so there is not a spike in glucose that you get from other sugars,” Dr Fletcher said.

“Interestingly trehalulose is also acariogenic, which means it doesn’t cause tooth decay.”

Dr Fletcher said the findings would strengthen the stingless bee honey market and create new opportunities.

“Stingless bee honey sells now for around AUD $200 per kilogram, which is up there with the price of Manuka and Royal Jelly honey,” she said.

“The high commercial value also makes it a risk for substitution, where people could sell other honey as stingless bee honey, or dilute the product.

“But due to this research, we can test for this novel sugar, which will help industry to set a food standard for stingless bee honey.

“People have patented ways of making trehalulose synthetically with enzymes and bacteria, but our research shows stingless bee honey can be used as a wholefood on its own or in other food to get the same health benefits.”

The work of Dr Fletcher and the research team has led to a new project funded by AgriFutures Australia and supported by the Australian Native Bee Association.

Working with Dr Natasha Hungerford from UQ’s Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation and Dr Tobias Smith from the School of Biological Sciences the new project will investigate storage and collection, to optimise the trehalulose content of Australian stingless bee honey.

Stingless bees (Meliponini) occur in most tropical and sub-tropical regions, with more than 500 species across Neotropical, Afrotropical and Indo-Australian regions.

Like the well-known Apis mellifera honeybees, stingless bees live in permanent colonies made up of a single queen and workers, who collect pollen and nectar to feed larvae within the colony.

Dr Fletcher said keeping native stingless bees was gaining in popularity in Australia, for their role as pollinators as well as for their unique honey.

As well as having health benefits, stingless bee honey is valued for its flavour and is in high demand from chefs.

We Can’t Breathe, English footballers against racism


Black Lives matter slogan on English football shoe

From daily The Morning Star in Britain, 24 July 2020:

Men’s Football: SRtRC launch “We Can’t Breathe” new anti-racism campaign

LIVERPOOL’S Jordan Henderson and Trent Alexander-Arnold are helping spearhead a new anti-racism campaign.

The Premier League-winning duo have linked up with Show Racism the Red Card for the charity’s video “We Can’t Breathe.”

This 24 July 2020 video from Britain says about itself:

We Can’t Breathe: A Show Racism the Red Card original film

Two months after the murder of George Floyd the world is still reeling from watching yet another unarmed Black person’s life be taken away from them.

Show Racism the Red Card’s latest original film: ‘We Can’t Breathe: How Eight Horrifying Minutes Lead to a Global Reckoning” explores Black Lives Matter in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, and highlights the importance of education in eradicating racism and discrimination from our society.

In the United States, Black Americans are two-and-a-half times more likely to be shot and killed by police. Whilst in the UK, one-in-eight young black men were the subjects of stop in searches in London during the lockdown.

Systemic barriers still stand in the way of BAME people in Britain, and whilst George Floyd made people sit up and pay attention, there is still an awfully long way to go.

The Morning Star article continues:

The video also includes former Wales rugby player Colin Charvis and ex-England cricketer Monty Panesar and aims to teach people about the impact of George Floyd’s death.

Floyd died while being restrained by a Minneapolis police officer on May 25 and it sparked protests across the world, with Premier League players taking a knee before games in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.

Members of Parliament and Black Lives Matter activists are involved.

Former West Ham and Newcastle goalkeeper Shaka Hislop is the charity’s honorary president and has joined protest marches himself in the United States.

He said: “The experiences [in the video] live out in real time and they weigh heavy. We took the decision, despite the pandemic, to go into battle in the nearest city where we live and join the Black Lives Matter march.”

Labour MP David Lammy contributes to the video.

Show Racism the Red Card chief executive Ged Grebby said: “We are dedicated to tackling racism and promoting change in society through education. With this short film, we’re hoping we can again contribute to a discussion around combatting rife racism in society.

“However more still needs to be done. As the recent events over the past couple of months show, racism is still very much alive around the world, and we stand alongside all those who are protesting against it.”

Bad sharks news


This July 2019 video says about itself:

Sharks 101 | National Geographic

Sharks can rouse fear and awe like no other creature in the sea. Find out about the world’s biggest and fastest sharks, how sharks reproduce, and how some species are at risk of extinction.

From the University of Exeter in Engeland, 22 July 2020:

Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast.

University of Exeter scientists studied four species of demersal (seabed-dwelling) shark.

Of the 46 sharks examined, 67% contained microplastics and other human-made fibres.

From James Cook University in Australia, 22 July 2020:

A massive global study of the world’s reefs has found sharks are ‘functionally extinct’ on nearly one in five of the reefs surveyed.

Professor Colin Simpfendorfer from James Cook University in Australia was one of the scientists who took part in the study, published today in Nature by the Global FinPrint organisation. He said of the 371 reefs surveyed in 58 countries, sharks were rarely seen on close to 20 percent of those reefs.

Torturing slave owner, a ‘hero’ no more


Contractors in Cardiff, Wales encase a statue of slave trader Sir Thomas Picton (left) and (right) a portrait of the slaver

From daily The Morning Star in Britain, 24 July 2020:

Statue of ‘sadistic’ slaver who tortured a 14-year-old girl removed from Cardiff city hall

A CARDIFF statue of a “sadistic” slaver who had a teenage girl tortured was boarded up today following a vote to have it removed from in front of the city hall.

The marble memorial to Sir Thomas Picton has stood there since 1916, when it was unveiled by future prime minister David Lloyd George as part of a series depicting “heroes of Wales.”

Picton was the most senior British officer killed at the Battle of Waterloo but was also known for having used the slave trade to amass a considerable fortune.

He was the colonial governor of Trinidad from 1797 to 1803, during which “highly brutal” time he had a dozen slaves executed, and in 1806, Picton was found guilty of having ordered the torture of a 14-year-old mixed-race girl.

The torture of Louisa Calderon, which involved her being suspended with rope by one arm above a spike in the floor, was an attempt to get her to confess to stealing from a businessman she lived with as his mistress.

Picton was never sentenced and the verdict was overturned following a retrial two years later.

Cardiff’s Lord Mayor Dan De’Ath, the first black person to hold the post, called for the statue of the “sadistic 19th-century slave-owner” to be taken down.

The council voted to remove the statue from the Marble Hall of Heroes on Thursday night with 57 in favour, five against and nine abstentions.

Mr De’Ath said: “I’m delighted. I think the way Cardiff has gone about the whole thing has been the right way. We’ve used democratic means to take it down.

“Most people were incredibly supportive. They recognise the significance of the statue and what an affront it is to black people. Black lives do matter.”