Young lions swimming crocodile infested river


This 6 March 2020 video from Zambia says about itself:

Young Lions Try to Cross Crocodile-Infested Waters

A trio of teenage lions are desperate to cross the shallows of the Luangwa River, in order to reunite with their pride. One problem: the river is infested with crocodiles, waiting for an easy meal.

Peace illegal in Erdogan’s Turkey


This July 2015 Associated Press video from Turkey says about itself:

A thousand women demonstrate for peace on border

00:00 Protestors with hands in the air chanting 00:09 Protestors cheer the arrival of a bus with more demonstrators arriving 00:13 Wide reverse shot of demonstration 00:16 SOUNDBITE: (Turkish) Elif Akgul, spokeswoman for “Kadin Platform”, or Women Platform: 00:27 Close-up of women listening 00:33 Women with banner chanting 00:42 Protesters acting out mock fight 00:47 Close-up of woman and flowers 00:53 Woman waving and cheering 01:00 Wide of protest 01:04 Ends

By Steve Sweeney:

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Activists hit out as anti-war slogans banned in Istanbul

ACTIVISTS and human-rights lawyers in Istanbul today demanded that a ban on the slogan “no to war” and demonstrations against military operations in Syria be overturned.

The city governor’s office came under fire after it issued a decree against all actions and activities criticising Turkey’s offensive in Idlib province, where it is holed up with its jihadist allies.

The ban prohibits all rallies, demonstrations and the distribution of anti-war literature “because they can cause public indignation,” the governor’s office said in a statement.

But the prevention of peaceful gatherings was branded “unacceptable” and a breach of international conventions by Gulseren Yoleri, chairwoman of the Human Rights Association’s Istanbul branch.

She said: “To praise peace, to demand peace is a responsibility. Therefore banning statements defending peace and life and human rights is unacceptable.

“Human rights defenders will always advocate peace. For this reason, we think that the ban must be removed as soon as possible.”

Turkey has moved to silence all opposition to its illegal invasions and occupations of northern Syria.

This morning Umar Karatepe, head of communications for the Confederation of Progressive Trade Unions (Disk), was detained over social media posts opposing Turkey’s actions in Idlib.

He was freed on a judicial order after being interrogated about the content of his tweets.

Mr Karatepe said that it was “the price to defend life and peace,” adding: “that price is not worse than death and war.”

Investigations are also under way into scores of opposition politicians, mostly from the Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) for opposing the so-called Operation Peace Spring — Turkey’s war against Kurds in northern Syria.

HDP co-chairs Pervin Buldan and Mithat Sancar have demanded the recall of parliament and a debate to be held on the war in Syria so that the public are informed of developments.

They insisted that dialogue was the only solution, hitting out at the “cover up, censorship and blocking of social media platforms.”

Earlier this week the United Nations accused Turkey of potential war crimes during its operations in northern Syria.

It warned that charges could be brought against Turkish military commanders for atrocities committed by the myriad of jihadist groups it supports, including the Free Syrian Army.

This included the brutal torture and execution of Kurdish-Syrian politician Hevrin Khalef whose body was found dumped at the side of the road in October last year.

Peregrine falcons on Amsterdam Rijksmuseum


Peregrine falcon on Amsterdam, the Netherlands Rijksmuseum, photo by Rob Buiter

This photo by Rob Buiter shows a peregrine falcon on the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Recently, a peregrine couple showed they intended to nest on this building.

The museum welcomes the birds. They have put two nest boxes on the building.

Rijksmuseum, photo by Rob Buiter

On this photo by Rob Buiter, one of these nest boxes is under the clock on the left tower.

Bee Love Award, thank you Rachana Dhaka!


Bee Love Award

Thank you so much, dear Rachana Dhaka, for nominating Dear Kitty. Some blog for the Bee Love Award!

This beautiful award is new for me. Though bees are not new on this blog.

The rules are:

1. Attach the Bee Love Logo on top.
2. Ping back to Rachana Dhaka.
3. Thank your fellow blogger who nominated you.
4. Nominate fellow bloggers. And tell them on their blogs that they have been nominated.

My nominees are:

1. Arlen Shahverdyan’s Literary blog
2. It Is What It Is
3. JSC: Jamaicans in Solidarity with Cuba
4. Reaching Joy
5. Sharmishtha Basu
6. Flyhiee.com
7. WOMAVES
8. Serene Words
9. Creative Imaginarium
10. Glover Gardens
11. Rochelle Asquith
12. shakzdyer

Florida, USA turtles threatened by climate change


This 27 February 2013 video from the USA says about itself:

Park rangers release rehabilitated juvenile loggerhead turtles at Cape Canaveral Seashore immediately adjacent to NASA‘s Kennedy Space Center. I got to help since I happened upon the event during a beach stroll.

From the University of Central Florida in the USA:

Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial

March 4, 2020

Sea level rise and hurricanes are a threat to sea turtle nesting habitat along national seashores in the Southeast, but a new study predicts the greatest impact to turtles will be at Canaveral National Seashore.

The University of Central Florida-led study, which was published recently in the journal Ecological Applications, examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict the amount of beach habitat loss at Canaveral, Cumberland Island, Cape Lookout, and Cape Hatteras national seashores by the year 2100. Sea turtles help maintain the coastal ecosystem and are indicators for the health of sandy beaches.

When comparing sea turtle nesting density with predicted beach loss at the sites, they found nesting habitat loss would not be equal. The researchers predicted that by 2100, Canaveral would lose about 1 percent of its loggerhead habitat, while the three other seashores will lose between approximately 2.5 to 6.7 percent each.

Although Canaveral’s percentage loss is smaller, the impact at this national seashore will be greater because of its nesting density.

“Canaveral is part of the core loggerhead nesting area for the Southeast,” says Marta Lyons, a preeminent postdoctoral fellow in UCF’s Department of Biology and the study’s lead author. “The nests are already pretty well packed in there, so even a small loss of area can have a big impact on nesting sea turtle populations.”

To determine beach loss at the study sites, the researchers used sea level rise and storm surge estimates and considered the effects of impervious structures along the shorelines, such as roads and buildings, in restricting natural beach movement. To do this, they developed a new method to calculate current and future sea turtle nesting areas that takes into account nesting data, beach length and width, and the impact of impervious surfaces.

Lyons says one of the goals was to create digital maps for the National Park Service to understand how sea turtle nesting areas will change with sea level rise and how resources could be managed.

“As the National Park Service thinks about future developments, whether that’s putting in a new lifeguard station or new bathrooms, this method of calculating current and future sea turtle nesting area can help them decide where to put them,” she says.

Sea turtles around the world are threatened by marine plastic debris, mostly through ingestion and entanglement. Now, researchers have new evidence to explain why all that plastic is so dangerous for the turtles: they mistake the scent of stinky plastic for food: here.