Two young little owls, video


This 20 November 2019 video is about two young little owls.

Elma Gussenhoven in the Netherlands made this video.

Fishing net lights save turtles and dolphins


This June 2019 video from the USA says about itsfelf:

Reducing Bycatch Helps Restore Sea Turtle Populations

Bycatch—when animals are accidentally caught while people are fishing for other species—is the biggest threat to sea turtles in the ocean. This project is helping reduce sea turtle bycatch and restoring their populations after the Deepwater Horizon [BP] disaster.

From the University of Exeter in England:

Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins

December 5, 2019

Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.

LED lights along the top of floating gillnets cut accidental “bycatch” of sea turtles by more than 70%, and that of small cetaceans (including dolphins and porpoises) by more than 66%.

The study, by the University of Exeter and Peruvian conservation organisation ProDelphinus, looked at small-scale vessels departing from three Peruvian ports between 2015 and 2018, and found the lights didn’t reduce the amount of fish caught from “target species” (ie what the fishers wanted to catch).

The findings support previous research which suggested LED lights reduce bycatch of seabirds in gillnets by about 85%. Gillnets, which can be either anchored or move with the ocean currents, are designed to entangle or snare fish by the gills, and are the largest component of small-scale fisheries in many countries.

“Gillnet fisheries often have high bycatch rates of threatened marine species such as sea turtles, whales, dolphins and seabirds,” said lead author Alessandra Bielli, who carried out analyses as part of her master’s research at the Centre for Ecology and Conservation at Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Cornwall.

“This could lead to declines in the populations of these non-target species — yet few solutions to reduce gillnet bycatch have been developed.

“Sensory cues — in this case LED lights — are one way we might alert such species to the presence of fishing gear in the water.”

The researchers placed lights every 10m along the float line of 864 gillnets, pairing each with an unlit net to compare the results.

“The dramatic reduction in bycatch of sea turtles and cetaceans in illuminated nets shows how this simple, relatively low-cost technique could help these species and allow fishers to fish more sustainably. Given the success we have had, we hope other fisheries with bycatch problems will also try illuminating their fishing nets,” said Exeter PhD graduate Dr Jeffrey Mangel, of Peruvian NGO ProDelphinus.

Most of the turtles caught in the study were green turtles (86%), though loggerhead and olive ridley turtles were also caught.

Among the small cetaceans captured, 47% were long-beaked common dolphins, 26% were dusky dolphins and 24% were Burmeister’s porpoises.

“This work has further shown the usefulness of lights on nets to save wildlife. We now need lights that are ever more robust and affordable,” said Professor Brendan Godley, of the University of Exeter.

Fluid dynamics may help drones capture a dolphin’s breath in midair: here.

Big pro-climate demonstrations in Spain, Chile


Climate activist Greta Thunberg (centre) walks at the COP25 climate talks summit in Madrid

This photo shows Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg (centre) at the COP25 climate talks summit in Madrid, Spain.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain today:

Tens of thousands march for the climate in Madrid

TENS of thousands of people marched in Madrid and Santiago, Chile, today to demand real action on climate change.

Swedish eco-warrior Greta Thunberg joined the mass demo in the Spanish capital, where the COP-25 climate summit has been taking place.

Marchers united behind the slogan “the world has woken up to the climate emergency.”

Greta joined teenagers staging a sit-in in the UN climate summit itself who held hands, sang Power to the People and waved Fridays for Future banners.

Chilean groups on the march carried banners denouncing the neoliberal regime of Chilean President Sebastian Pinera, which had been due to host the summit but dropped the idea in the face of mass anti-government demonstrations which have rocked the country for over a month.

Civil Society for Climate Action (SCAC) spokeswoman Estefania Gonzalez said: “I come from Chile, a country where an avocado tree has more right to water than a person.”

The mass protests against inequality in Chile were “directly related to the environmental crisis,” she said.

“Today, climate action means social equality, it’s not possible to have social equality without environmental equality.”

SCAC has run a Social Summit for Climate Action alongside the UN summit, with a strong presence from indigenous groups in Latin America who are seeing their rights to land attacked by the Jair Bolsonaro government in Brazil.

They have also been victims of a violent terror campaign implemented by Bolivia’s coup government since the military overthrew the country’s elected, and indigenous, president Evo Morales last month.

This September 2019 video says about itself:

Thousands of people joined a global climate strike in the Chilean capital Santiago on Friday.

Schoolchildren and workers marched past La Moneda presidential palace to demand action from government.

Demonstrators dressed in green and brought a series of homemade signs and banners to argue for their cause.

The strike in Chile was one of many taking in Latin American cities and across the world.

The global action follows a series of school strikes initially inspired by Swedish teenage and climate activist Greta Thunberg.

The Morning Star report continues:

A march in the Chilean capital Santiago was timed to coincide with the demo in Spain.

An alliance of US states, cities, academic institutions and companies opened its own venue at the climate talks, aiming to show that despite the Donald Trump government’s decision to pull out of the Paris accord, many in the US remain committed to curbing global warming.

Elan Strait, who manages the We Are Still In initiative for the World Wildlife Fund, said the movement was “a short-term band-aid not only to get those carbon dioxide emissions down but also to encourage policymakers to lay the ground for further achievements.”

Fourteen seafaring nations published a study on the likely impact of predicted warming on maritime industries today, saying if emissions were not sharply reduced fisheries will be devastated.

Rare brown hyenas in Namibian ghost town


This 5 December 2019 video from Namibia says about itself:

This Ghost Town Is Home To Africa’s Rarest Predator | BBC Earth

This elusive brown hyena has made a home in the ruins in the Namib Desert. She’s raised nine generations of cubs, can she provide for her current brood in the most hostile country on the planet?

Golden jackal, first time in Drenthe province


This July 2019 video from Israel is about a golden jackal, a red fox, Egyptian vultures and other birds.

Golden jackals are traditionally an Asian and east European species.

However, they are expanding to the west. They have been spotted in Germany and Denmark.

Dutch daily De Volkskrant reports today that for the first time ever, a golden jackal was seen on a camera trap in Drenthe province.

The species had been seen twice before in the Netherlands, in Gelderland province.