Good United States freshwater fish news


This 2017 video says about itself:

Few people realize that there are over 1,000 fish species swimming in North America’s fresh water.

From PLOS:

Freshwater fish species richness has increased in Ohio River Basin since ’60s

April 24, 2019

The taxonomic and trophic composition of freshwater fishes in the Ohio River Basin has changed significantly in recent decades, possibly due to environmental modifications related to land use and hydrology, according to a study published April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mark Pyron of Ball State University, and colleagues.

Human-made threats to freshwater ecosystems are numerous and globally widespread. The legacy of agriculture and land use is manifested in the Ohio River Basin, drastically modified via logging and wetland draining following European colonization. After this period, the Ohio River Basin watershed was historically dominated by agriculture, and then converted from agriculture to forest during the 1960s-80s. The effects of these changes on fish throughout the basin are not fully known.

Pyron and colleagues used 57 years of rotenone and electrofishing fish collection survey data (1957-2014), collected by the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, to examine changes to taxonomy, trophic classifications, and life history strategies of freshwater fish assemblages in the Ohio River Basin over this period.

Annual species richness varied from 31 to 90 species and generally showed a positive trend, increasing over time. Taxonomic and trophic structure was correlated with the decrease in agriculture and increase in forest. The trophic composition of fish catch also correlated with this changes to the Basin’s hydrology. In general, the environmental modifications were associated with more fish species which feed on plant matter and detritus, and fewer fish feeding on plankton and on other fish.

The authors believe that future land use modifications, climate change, and altered biotic interactions could continue to contribute to complex patterns of change in freshwater fish assemblages in the Ohio River.

Pyron adds: “We found significant changes in species and trophic composition of freshwater fishes in the Ohio River Basin from 1957-2014. Species richness increased with year and the fish assemblages varied with changes in landuse and hydrologic alteration.”

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Kill LGBTQ people preacher unwelcome in Amsterdam


This 30 July 2018 BBC video from Britain says about itself:

The American Preacher Spreading Hate

Director Hannah Livingston spends six months tracking two of America’s most radical Christian hate groups – a notorious pastor from Arizona who has been banned from the UK and a network of preachers who take their extremist message directly to the streets.

This film shows how America’s constitutional right to free speech allows these groups to spread homophobia and Islamophobia in an increasingly polarised and divided political climate. Drawing on a literal interpretation of the Bible, the pastor opens new churches in America and influences people around the world by broadcasting his sermons over the internet.

On 24 April 2019, NOS TV reported that the majority of the Dutch parliament want the government to ban United States homophobic Baptist preacher Steven Anderson from coming to the Netherlands to preach in Amsterdam.

An MP of the right-wing VVD party tweeted, translated:

This dangerous ‘preacher’ thinks, eg, that gays should burn

According to Anderson, LGBT should mean Let God Burn Them.

He is also vehemently anti-abortion, anti-condoms and advocates killing ex-president Obama.

and that the bloody attack on a gay bar in Orlando was ‘good news’. …

GroenLinks MP Buitenweg tweets that while freedom of expression is an important right, the line is crossed when calling for hatred, violence and intimidation.

Dutch LGBTQ organisation COC calls on the State Secretary to deny Anderson access to our country as an unwanted alien. Anderson has previously been refused entry or has been deported by, eg, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Botswana and Jamaica.

“He calls for hatred. He wants governments to kill LGBT people and wants LGBT people to shoot themselves through the head“, said Philip Tijsma of COC Netherlands this morning in the NOS Radio 1 Journal.

Holocaust

The Center for Documentation and Information on Israel agrees with the COC call. According to Anderson, Jews lied about the Holocaust … . The CIDI points out that denying the Holocaust is punishable in the Netherlands.

Anderson intends to preach in Amsterdam on 23 May. He keeps the location a secret, as he does not want LGBTQ people to protest against him there.

Good Pacific green turtle news


This 30 December 2018 video from Australia says about itself:

Tracking Green Turtles in the Great Barrier Reef | Fearless Adventures with Jack Randall

Jack dives into the Great Barrier Reef to wrangle Green Sea Turtles for wildlife conservation and study.

From PLOS:

Immense Pacific coral reef survey shows green sea turtle populations increasing

First comprehensive in-water survey shows key role of ocean temperature and human protection

April 24, 2019

Densities of endangered green turtles are increasing in Pacific coral reefs, according to the first comprehensive in-water survey of turtle populations in the Pacific. The study, by Sarah Becker of the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California and colleagues, publishes April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Coral-dwelling sea turtles have long been endangered due largely to human exploitation — hawksbills for tortoiseshell and green turtles for food — and destruction of coral reef habitat, but the institution of global protection efforts beginning in the 1970s aimed to reverse this decline. Land-based surveys of breeding and nesting sites have provided important evidence of population sizes, but are limited in scope and without confirmation from the ocean where the turtles spend the vast majority of their time.

To more fully understand the density of the populations of these two turtle species, as well as the environmental and anthropogenic factors that have driven them, the authors combined data from 13 years of in-water visual surveys of turtle abundance near 53 islands, atolls, and reefs throughout the U.S. Pacific. During a survey, a slow-moving boat tows a pair of divers at about 15 meters below the surface, where they record details of habitat and sea life as it comes into view. In all, the surveys covered more than 7,300 linear kilometers and observed more than 3,400 turtles of the two species.

Survey data showed that American Samoa had the highest density of hawksbills, while the Pacific Remote Islands Area, a mostly uninhabited region about a thousand miles southwest of Hawaii, had the most green turtles. Hawksbill numbers were far lower (< 10%) than green turtle counts, indicating that many conservation threats still exist for this species. Density of green turtles were driven primarily by ocean temperatures and productivity, but suggested effects from historical and present-day human impacts. Over the survey period, green turtle populations were either stable or increased. The lowest density but the highest annual population growth was found in the Hawaiian Islands, suggesting that protective regulations may be paying off in allowing green turtle populations to rebound.

Becker adds: “This study represents one of the largest sea turtle population surveys ever conducted, filling critical gaps on in-water abundance and drivers of population density. Across the tropical Pacific several locations held impressive densities of sea turtles, and in all regions densities were driven by bottom-up forces like ocean temperatures and productivity and top-down forces such as human impacts.”