Theocracy in Bavaria, Germany


This video about Germany says about itself:

Cardinal Marx condemns Bavaria decision to hang crosses in all public buildings

1 May 2018

‘If the cross is just seen as a cultural symbol, then it has not been understood’, Marx said. The enactment of a decision to hang crosses in all public buildings in Bavaria has triggered “Division, stirred up trouble and played people off against one another”, Cardinal Reinhard Marx of Munich, the president of the German bishops’ conference told the ‘Süddeutsche Zeitung’ on 30 April. Bavaria last week ordered all government buildings to display a cross at their entrance.

Apparently, the CSU party government in Bavaria is more fanatically Roman Catholic than Cardinal Marx or than the pope (at least the present pope; I am not so sure about his predecessor Ratzinger). It looks like the CSU is scared of losing right-wing voters to the Islamophobic neo-fascist AfD party in this year’s elections. That is also why they are making Bavaria a police state.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Cross from tomorrow on mandatory in Bavarian government buildings

A Christian cross, visibly hung at the entrance. From tomorrow on , this will be mandatory in every government building in the German state of Bavaria. The Kreuzpflicht, on which there is much criticism, also from Christian tendencies, comes from the brain of state premier Markus Söder (CSU), who wants to emphasize the cultural values ​​of Germany. …

There is a lot of criticism of the cross obligation. For example, Söder is said to have established the rule in response to the rising popularity of the anti-immigration party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD). In October there are state elections. Söder is said to mainly use the cross to win voters from the right-wing, who believe that immigration from Muslim countries harms the German identity.

Cross is not folklore

There are also many disapproving reactions from Christian sides. Leaders of the Catholic Church believe that the obligation to have crosses leads to division. “The cross is a truly religious symbol and should not be reduced to folklore and regional use”, said the Roman Catholic Bishop Franz Jung in an interview. According to Jung, Söder is responsible for “division, unrest and fighting”.

Mandatory crosses are a mistake, says the Protestant religious scholar Johanne Harberer. “We have enough crosses in Bavaria, Söder abuses the religious symbol.”

The obligation to have crosses applies to all government buildings, but not to all government agencies. Only a recommendation applies to museums, universities and theaters. There are already crosses in courtrooms and many classrooms, writes Die Welt daily.

Just three months after taking office, the fourth government of Angela Merkel is facing possible dissolution. A fierce conflict over refugee policy between the conservative sister parties, Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and Christian Social Union (CSU), threatens to blow apart the Grand Coalition, which also includes the Social Democratic SPD. This could also mean the end of the chancellorship of Merkel, who has been German head of government since November 2005: here.

5 thoughts on “Theocracy in Bavaria, Germany

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