Fungi, trees and birds


This 11 September 2016 Dutch video from Gelderland regional TV is about a cyclists’ protest, organised by the Party for the Animals, against the Dutch royals hunting on the big Het Loo estate near Apeldoorn city, causing most bicycle tracks and footpaths to be closed off to the public.

Het Loo is called a royal domain, but is in fact property of the Dutch government. However, the Dutch royal family has the right to use it, eg, to hunt there and to close off roads and paths which might hinder hunting from September till December. “So, public property, but the public is not welcome”, a Wiesel village resident said.

Duke Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1876-1934), who became Prince Consort of the Netherlands, imported wild boar from his native Germany to hunt in Het Loo. This led to entry restrictions.

When Queen Wilhelmina, Henry’s wife, lived as a widow at Het Loo, there was less hunting and more paths became open to the public.

But after Wilhelmina’s death, royal hunting increased again, and so did access restrictions against the public.

After 10 November 2017 in Wenum-Wiesel in the Veluwe region came 11 November.

A robin just outside the window.

We are on our way to Het Loo. Just before the entrance gate, we hear a jay. And see an ancient barrow grave.

We pass the entrance gate, and proceed on the only ‘legal’ bicycle track. To the left and right, numerous signs of No entry.

Het Loo, 11 November 2017

Many trees with beautiful autumn leaves.

Het Loo, on 11 November 2017

A chaffinch. Great spotted woodpecker sound.

Fungi, 11 November 2017

A branch on the ground with beautiful orange fungi on it. Yellow stagshorn? To the right of it, another branch with brownish fungi.

Autumn leaves, 11 November 2017

More autumn leaves. Some on the forest floor …

Autumn leaves, on 11 November 2017

… some still on the trees.

Tinder fungi, 11 November 2017

A bit further, a fallen tree with many fungi on it. Including tinder fungi.

Tinder fungus, 11 November 2017

Including these big tinder fungi with orange undersides.

Tinder fungi, 11 November 2017

Stil more tinder fungi on the same big tree.

We continue to the Soerense veld. That is a heathland area. We thought heathland would be an interesting change from forest. However, another sign says No entry, because of royal family hunting. So, we go back.

Meibeek, 11 November 2017

Late in the afternoon, we go to the Meibeek stream. Sometimes people see kingfishers there. We don’t see them, but we do see beautiful reflections in the water.

Close to the Meibeek bank, an amethyst deceiver mushroom.

8 thoughts on “Fungi, trees and birds

  1. Pingback: Robin and great tit | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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  5. Pingback: How fungi grow, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Dutch public land closed for royal family hunting | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Protest against Dutch royal hunting | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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