Robin wishes Merry Christmas, video


This video from Britain says about itself:

Waitrose Christmas TV ad 2016 HomeForChristmas

A courageous robin undertakes an epic journey home to Britain, where a young girl eagerly awaits his annual return.

Another video from Britain used to say about itself:

Christmas Carols, Music and Birdsong 🎄 Featuring Robin Red Breast

9 November 2017

Christmas Carols and Bird Song 🎄 One hour of traditional instrumental Christmas songs and carols accompanied by the sound of gentle bird song. The bird in the video is the European robin. If you’re ever in Britain around Christmas time, you’ll find pictures of robin red breasts adorning Christmas cards, ornaments, stamps, chocolate boxes, shop windows and Christmas wrapping paper.

WHY ARE ROBINS ON CHRISTMAS CARDS?

It’s all inspired by the robins who used to deliver the Christmas cards in 19th century Britain.

In the 1800s, British postmen wore bright red uniforms. They wore red in honor of the crown since red is considered both a Royal color and an important color on the English flag. (Incidentally, this may also be one of the reasons why British post boxes were eventually standardized to be red). The postmen in their red-breasted coats resembled the much-loved British bird, the robin red-breast, earning Victorian postmen the nick-name: Robins.

Around Christmas time, people would eagerly await the Robins’ delivery of Christmas cards from near and far. Some greeting card artists were inspired by this to illustrate their cards with the joyous delivery of letters, and instead of drawing a postman, one artist decided to draw the Robins’ namesake, the robin birds, delivering letters in their little beaks. The trend caught on and survives to this day despite the fact that the postmen’s red coat uniforms and the postmen’s Robin nickname have long been retired to the history books.

Video Produced by Paul Dinning – Wildlife in Cornwall

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