Polish insecticide eggs as well


This 11 August 2017 video says about itself:

Europe contaminated eggs crisis: Two arrested as scandal widens

The scandal keeps widening with millions of eggs going down the drain. Denmark now says 20 tons of eggs contaminated with pesticide Fipronil have been sold in the country.

Slovakia and Romania have also reported their presence, bringing the total number of affected countries to eleven.

This as British authorities said a far greater number of eggs than previously thought had been imported from farms linked to the case.

Steve Wearns, Director of Policy, UK Food Standards Agency: “We think that around 700,000 eggs have now been brought into the UK from implicated farms from Belgium and the Netherlands. That’s still a very small proportion of the number of eggs we consume. We consume around 10 billion eggs each year.”

Officials insist risks to public health are minimal… even though Fipronil could cause damage to human organs, the amount found on eggs is tiny. But intentional use of this insecticide in the food industry constitutes a serious offence under European law.

On Thursday Dutch and Belgian authorities jointly raided multiple locations and arrested two managers on suspicion of mixing the toxin in products used to treat lice in chickens.

Frans de Neree tot Babberich, Dutch Public Prosecutor’s Office spokesman: “They were arrested for endangering public health. If it can be proven that they acted deliberately, they can face up to 15 years in prison.”

The joint raids came a day after Belgium accused the Netherlands of knowing about the contaminated eggs since November…However, officials in Brussels have also admitted they knew of the problem as early as June.

This video, from Britain, used to say about itself:

10 August 2017

BRUSSELS officials knew about the outbreak of contaminated eggs across Europe last month, it has been claimed.

Millions of eggs have been pulled from European supermarkets in the past week after an outbreak of the insecticide Fipronil.

The UK has been swept up in the scandal, with around 70,000 eggs recalled from Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Morrisons and Asda stores.

According to a new report, Belgium’s safety authority FASNK alerted Dutch officials and the European Commission to the scare on July 6.

The report states: “July 6 2017: Question addressed to the Netherlands via the anti-fraud system AAC-FF, explaining the hypotheses concerning the original contamination.

“This message is also read by the European authorities that operate the system.”

Brussels food law is overseen by its Administrative Assistance and Cooperation System (AAC) and its Food Fraud Network (FF).

Earlier today, Dutch police detained two men suspected of being involved in the illegal use of Fipronil at poultry farms.

The pesticide is banned by the EU for use on animals destined for human consumption, such as chickens.

Reported adverse effects from consumption of Fipronil include seizures, vomiting, dizziness and head and stomach pain.

The Commission admitted Dutch and Belgian authorities had spoken on July 6, but it insisted it was not involved in the exchange.

A spokesman said: “On July 6, there was a bilateral exchange between Belgium and the Netherlands within the framework of the so-called administrative support and cooperation system.

“The Commission does not actively monitor the exchange in the AAC as is the case with the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF).”

Speaking to German media, the Belgian official did not send an official risk report on the Fipronil outbreak until July 20.

He added: “The European Commission did not know about Fipronil contaminated eggs until July 20, when the Belgian authorities informed the Commission via our rapid alert system.

“The Commission did not receive any information about this contamination accusation before July 20, not via technical or any other channels.”

Belgium’s Agricultural Minister said his Dutch colleagues had been made aware about eggs contaminated with Fipronil since November 2016.

The minister, Denis Ducarme, said a report had confirmed Dutch eggs had tested positive for the potentially dangerous pesticide.

But the head of Dutch Food Safety Authority, Rob van Lint, denied his claims.

He said: “The accusation that we knew of Fipronil in eggs in November 2016 is not correct. At that time, there was no evidence that there could be an acute risk to food safety.”

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Also Fipronil in Polish eggs in the Netherlands

Today, 09:50

The pesticide Fipronil is also found in eggs imported from Poland. An egg trader or processor reported to the Dutch Food and Welfare Authority NVWA that in a sample he found a too high level of fipronil in Polish eggs, says an NVWA spokesperson. …

According to the Algemeen Dagblad daily, the Netherlands imports one to two million eggs from Poland each week. They are processed into different products and go to restaurants and Polish shops. In regular supermarkets they are not sold. The eggs are cheap because the rules for poultry farming in Poland are less strict.

European network

Hubers of agricultural organisation LTO believes that the Fipronil infection in Poland does not originate from ChickFriend, the Barneveld company that has used the insecticide in the Netherlands. According to Hubers, a European network is active because the use of Fipronil is very lucrative.

This 19 July 2018 video from the USA is called USDA inspectors complained about chemicals sprayed on poultry. They were ignored.

1 thought on “Polish insecticide eggs as well

  1. Pingback: Millions of animals’ lives wasted | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.