Astronomy news


This video from the USA says about itself:

First Science From Juno at Jupiter (NASA News Audio with Visuals)

Scientists from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter discussed their first in-depth science results in a media teleconference on May 25, 2017, at 2 p.m. ET (11 a.m. PT, 1800 UTC), when multiple papers with early findings were published online by the journal Science and Geophysical Research Letters.

The teleconference participants were:

Diane Brown, program executive at NASA Headquarters in Washington
Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio
Jack Connerney, deputy principal investigator at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
Heidi Becker, Juno radiation monitoring investigation lead at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California
Candy Hansen, Juno co-investigator at the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona

Juno launched on Aug. 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, and arrived in orbit around Jupiter on July 4, 2016. In its current exploration mission, Juno soars low over the planet’s cloud tops, as close as about 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers). During these flybys, Juno probes beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and studies its auroras to learn more about the planet’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

For more information about the Juno mission, visit here.

Jupiter’s precocious birth happened in the solar system’s first million years. Early formation date may explain our oddball planetary lineup. By Lisa Grossman, 3:01pm, June 12, 2017.

Water circling a drain provides insight into black holes. Energy boost from rotational superradiance detected for the first time. By Emily Conover, 11:00am, June 12, 2017.

Swift kick from a supernova could knock a black hole askew. Gravitational wave detection hints at unexpected power from star explosion. By Emily Conover, 2:37pm, June 9, 2017.

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