Small primate species discovered in Angola


This 2011 video from Tanzania says about itself:

Andrew Perkin and Johan Karlsson conducting a galago [Galagoides] survey in Zanzibar.

From Sci-News.com:

Galagoides kumbirensis: New Species of Dwarf Galago Discovered in Angola

Apr 10, 2017 by Enrico de Lazaro

An international group of primatologists has discovered a new primate, Galagoides kumbirensis (Angolan dwarf galago), with features not been seen by science before.

Galagos, also known as bushbabies, are small, woolly, long-tailed primates that are widespread over sub-Saharan Africa, and make up the family Galagidae.

Over the last half century, their number of species recognized has slowly climbed from 6 to 19 species (including the new one).

The newly-discovered species, the Angolan dwarf galago, belongs to the genus Galagoides (dwarf galagos, or dwarf bushbabies).

“This new species is a very exciting discovery,” said Dr. Russell Mittermeier of Conservation International.

“It is only the fifth new primate described from the African mainland since 2000 and only the second species of galago. What is more, it is from Angola, where there has been very little primate research to date.”

The Angolan dwarf galago is a small gray-brown galago with a darker, long-haired tail.

It is the largest known dwarf galago: the typical head-and-body length for this species is from 6.7 to 7.9 inches (17-20 cm), and the tail varies from 6.7 to 9.5 inches (17-24 cm) long.

This new species is described in a paper published online recently in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

“Muzzle slightly up-turned, pink below and dark above, merging into dark eye-rings with a conspicuous white nose stripe between the eyes,” the authors wrote in the paper.

“The remainder of the face gray, suffused with brown, and set off from white cheeks, chin, and neck.”

“Inner ears white towards the base and yellowish towards margins. Ears gray above with two light spots where the ears join the crown. Crown, dorsum forelimbs, thighs, and flanks gray with a brown wash.”

“Ventrum, surface of forelimbs and hindlimbs creamy yellow. Yellow strongest where the light ventrum merges into the darker dorsum.”

“Tail darker towards the tip and slightly longer than the body. Tail held curled when at rest.”

The morphology and calls of the Angolan dwarf galago are so unique that there was no need to resort to genetic techniques to verify it further.

“When we first encountered the new species in Kumbira Forest in north-western Angola, we heard a distinctive ‘crescendo’ call similar to that of a tiny galago, but upon seeing one, we were struck by its remarkably large size,” said lead author Magdalena Svensson, a researcher with the Nocturnal Primate Research Group at Oxford Brookes University.

“Until now, call types have been the most reliable way to distinguish galago species, and to find one that did not match what we expected was very exciting.”

“The uncovering of this species is characteristic of the return of real biology,” said co-author Prof. Judith Masters, from Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa.

“Although DNA has yielded new and sometimes highly contestable specimens, in the case of this new galago, the differences are obvious for all to see.”

8 thoughts on “Small primate species discovered in Angola

  1. Pingback: Bird, primate, alligator brains and intelligence | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Primates in danger, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: How primates got fingernails, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Portugal’s fascist concentration camp, Lisbon exhibition | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.