‘Voting rights violations, not Russian hacking, real US election scandal’


This video from the USA, one day before the presidential election, says about itself:

Republicans CAUGHT Engaging in “Insane” Jim Crow-Style Voter Suppression

7 November 2016

The Republican Party of North Carolina takes part in an active effort to lobby against early voting and expanded voting hours in an attempt to disenfranchise Democratic voters.

By the Reverend Jesse Jackson in the USA:

Voter suppression: This fight ain’t over

Saturday 17th December 2016

Voter suppression is a far more pertinent threat to US democracy than the supposed Russian hacks, writes REV JESSE JACKSON

THE CIA conclusion that the Russians intervened in the US elections in order to help elect Donald Trump has sent Washington into one of its fabled tizzies.

WikiLeaks says that it did not get the emails about Hillary Clinton’s secret speeches for bankers and dirty tricks against Bernie Sanders from Russians; but from US Democratic party whistleblowers.

President Barack Obama has ordered an intelligence agency report before he leaves office.

Democrats and responsible Republicans are calling for congressional investigations. Pundits are arguing the Russians — combined with FBI director James Comey’s outrageous interventions — cost Hillary Clinton the election. In response, president-elect Trump is tweeting furiously about voter fraud, peddling lies about millions of illegal immigrants voting and many other things to distract from the escalating scandal.

Left out of this brouhaha is the systematic and purposeful voter suppression that certainly cost Clinton the election.

The Russians didn’t do it. It was done by right-wing partisan state officials eager to suppress the vote of people of colour, the young and the working poor. These efforts were open, systematic and widespread. And this domestic hacking at our elections was far more destructive than the hacking Russia is said to have done.

This was the first presidential election since the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act. According to the Brennan Centre, 14 states passed voter suppression laws that were in effect for the first time in November, including swing states like Ohio and Wisconsin.

The steps taken to suppress the vote aren’t secret: new requirements of voter ID that discriminate against the poor, the elderly and disproportionately people of colour; restrictions on the use of college ID impede student voting; closing registration weeks before election day; limiting early voting days, closing on Sundays; holding election day on a workday with limited hours for voting, making it difficult for those with inflexible hours to get to the polls; shutting down or moving polling places to confuse voters and force them to wait in long lines; purging voters from the polling lists, leaving them to cast provisional ballots at best; prohibiting felons who have paid their debt to society from ever recovering the right to vote, disproportionately impacting African-American men.

There is little doubt that these measures worked, and cost Clinton the election. In Wisconsin, for example, Trump’s margin of victory was 27,000. A record 300,000 registered voters lacked the newly required ID, contributing to the lowest turnout in 20 years. Turnout was down by more than 50,000 in Milwaukee, where 70 per cent of the state’s African-American population lives.

Part of the reason for lower turnout of Democratic voters will indeed probably be voter suppression. However, another cause is that enthusiasm among Democratic voters, African Americans and others, was far less for Clinton in 2016 than it had been for Obama in 2008 and 2012.

The present ‘Russian hacking’ fuss looks like an example of it being easier to blame ‘Johnny Foreigner’ instead of looking at the man (or woman) in the mirror; like precedents in the history of the USA, Russia and many other countries.

In North Carolina, black turnout was down 16 per cent in the first week of early voting, in part because there were 158 fewer polling places in the 40 counties with large numbers of black voters.

The targeting was intentional, with Republican officials celebrating the effects. The decision by the right-wing gang of five on the Supreme Court in the Shelby case effectively subverted the victory of the civil rights movement at Selma.

If Russians hacked the Democratic National Committee’s and the Clinton campaign’s emails to influence the election, it should be investigated. In an election decided by 80,000 votes in three states, it might have made a difference (as almost anything could in an election that close).

But what is clear is that Russian hacking was not nearly as effective as the partisan systematic suppression of the vote. And that effort is continuing. Republicans in Missouri took control and moved to institute new voting ID restrictions for the next election. In Wisconsin, Republicans announced plans for new restrictions on early voting.

Why aren’t Democrats railing about voter suppression and demanding congressional investigation and action? Why haven’t university presidents and civil rights lawyers joined in a national commission to detail the suppression and demand a strengthening of the Voting Rights Act? Why aren’t pundits pounding on this, outing the state officials and legislators who did it and exposing the right-wing apparatus that orchestrated it? Is it because Russian interference is more exotic? Is it because neither party thinks suppression of the votes of people of colour and the young is an unacceptable outrage?

I urge President Obama to launch an investigation and report on voter suppression to be released before he leaves office. President-elect Donald Trump says he wants to be the president of all Americans. If so, he should lead an effort to end voter suppression and to revive the Voting Rights Act. Democratic leaders say they want the party to build a broad majority coalition across lines of race. If so, they should be demanding an investigation of voter suppression and filibustering to force revival of the Voting Rights Act.

Inside the beltway, voter suppression isn’t hot. Republicans peddle the myth of voter fraud. Democrats cry foul on Russian interference. Neither party will focus on the biggest scandal of all: the fact that partisans in states across the country acted purposefully to suppress the right to vote of targeted groups of citizens.

We didn’t win the right to vote from politicians. Citizens had to march and protest, bleed and die to win that right. We can’t count on politicians to defend the right to vote — they, after all, are elected under the distorted rules we have. Citizens of conscience must move to end voter suppression and clean up our elections.

• Rev Jesse Jackson is the founder and president of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition. He was a leader in the civil rights movement alongside Dr Martin Luther King Jr and was twice a candidate for the president of the United States.

The U.S. has a long history of attempting to influence presidential elections in other countries – it’s done so as many as 81 times between 1946 and 2000, according to a database amassed by political scientist Dov Levin of Carnegie Mellon University: here.

Something About This Russia Story Stinks. Nearly a decade and a half after the Iraq-WMD faceplant, the American press is again asked to co-sign a dubious intelligence assessment: here.

The Massive Election-Rigging Scandal the Media Ignored. Republicans denied 7 million their right to vote, and no one seems to care: here.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “‘Voting rights violations, not Russian hacking, real US election scandal’

  1. Pingback: US NAACP leaders arrested for protesting Trump nominee Sessions | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Anti-Trump demonstration, London, 20 January | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Donald Trump’s Jeff Sessions, bad news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Anti-Trump protests in Britain | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Anti-Trump demonstrations videos | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Women’s March against Trump, 11 March Amsterdam | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Texas woman gets eight years in prison for voting | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: Trump’s United States Supreme Court nominee Gorsuch, bad news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s