Jamar Clark’s life, other black lives, do they matter?


This video from the USA says about itself:

“The System Is Set Up to Protect Officers“: Activists React to Lack of Charges in Jamar Clark Case

2 June 2016

Federal prosecutors in Minnesota announced Wednesday that no charges will be filed against the two police officers involved in the shooting death last fall of Jamar Clark, an unarmed 24-year-old African American. Clark was shot in the head after a scuffle with officers who responded to a report of an assault. However, multiple witnesses say Clark was shot while handcuffed.

Clark’s death sparked a series of protests in Minneapolis, including a weeks-long occupation outside the 4th Police Precinct and a protest during which white supremacists opened fire on a group of Black Lives Matter activists. We speak with Lena K. Gardner, co-founder and organizer of the Minneapolis chapter of Black Lives Matter. “There’s a very specific interpretation of events that happened in order to protect the officers,” Gardner says. “I believe that the system is set up to protect officers, to ensure that their version of events is given more credibility.”

This video from the USA says about itself:

Black Lives Matter Activist Convicted of Felony Lynching: “It’s More Than Ironic, It’s Disgusting”

2 June 2016

In Pasadena, California, Black Lives Matter organizer Jasmine Richards is facing four years in state prison after she was convicted of a rarely used statute in California law originally known as “felony lynching.” Under California’s penal code, “felony lynching” was defined as attempting to take a person out of police custody.

Jasmine was arrested and charged with felony lynching last September, after police accused her of trying to de-arrest someone during a peace march at La Pintoresca Park in Pasadena on August 29, 2015. The arrest and jailing of a young black female activist on charges of felony lynching sparked a firestorm of controversy.

Historically, the crime of lynching refers to when a white lynch mob takes a black person out of the custody of the police for the purpose of extrajudicially hanging them. In fact, the law’s name was so controversial that less than two months before Jasmine was arrested, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law legislation removing the word “lynching” from the penal code.

We speak with Richards’ lawyer, Nana Gyamfi, and Black Lives Matter organizer Melina Abdullah. “Her conviction is not only about punishing Jasmine Richards, but also is the lynching,” Abdullah says. “So it’s really disgusting and ironic that she’s charged and convicted with felony lynching, when the real lynching that’s carried out is done in the same way it was carried out in the late 19th, early 20th century, where it’s supposed to punish those who’ve dared to rise up against a system.”

4 thoughts on “Jamar Clark’s life, other black lives, do they matter?

  1. Pingback: Lethal attack on peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration in Texas | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Black Lives Matter demonstrations in Germany, elsewhere | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: In France, death of Adama Traoré, and of civil liberties? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Donald Trump’s spying on citizens, sculpture and ‘free speech’ | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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