North American mammoths, new study


This video says about itself:

1 December 2014

Woolly Mammoth: The Autopsy

Science Documentary hosted by Steven Mackintosh, published by Channel 4 in 2014 – English narration

The 2013 discovery in Siberia of the best-preserved mammoth yet has quickened the pace of one of the most ambitious and controversial projects in science: the cloning of the woolly mammoth. This one is unlike any mammoth found before; when it was dug out of the permafrost, a dark red liquid oozed from the frozen body. Speculation is rife: could the liquid be mammoth blood? And does the freshness of the mammoth’s flesh mean that a clone is now achievable?

This documentary follows an international team of mammoth specialists and cloning scientists as they carry out a historic autopsy in Siberia, and follows those who strive to bring these iconic giants of the Ice Age back from extinction. As the animal is carefully dissected and its tusks are examined, the programme reveals the life story of this mammoth in forensic detail.

From Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution:

Mammuthus Population Dynamics in Late Pleistocene North America: Divergence, Phylogeography and Introgression

06 April 2016

After evolving in Africa at the close of the Miocene, mammoths (Mammuthus sp.) spread through much of the northern hemisphere, diversifying morphologically as they entered various habitats. Paleontologically, these morphs are conventionally recognized as species.

In Pleistocene North America alone, several mammoth species have been recognized, inhabiting environments as different as cold tundra-steppe in the north and the arid grasslands or temperate savanna-parklands of the south. Yet mammoth phylogeographic studies have overwhelmingly focused on permafrost-preserved remains of only one of these species, Mammuthus primigenius (woolly mammoth).

Here we challenge this bias by performing a geographically and taxonomically wide survey of mammoth genetic diversity across North America. Using a targeted enrichment technique, we sequenced 67 complete mitochondrial genomes from non-primigenius specimens representing M. columbi (Columbian mammoth), M. jeffersonii (Jeffersonian mammoth), and M. exilis (pygmy mammoth), including specimens from contexts not generally associated with good DNA preservation.

While we uncovered clear phylogeographic structure in mammoth matrilines, their phylogeny as recovered from mitochondrial DNA is not compatible with existing systematic interpretations of their paleontological record. Instead, our results strongly suggest that various nominal mammoth species interbred, perhaps extensively.

We hypothesize that at least two distinct stages of interbreeding between conventional paleontological species are likely responsible for this pattern – one between Siberian woolly mammoths and resident American populations that introduced woolly mammoth phenotypes to the continent, and another between ecomorphologically distinct populations of woolly and Columbian mammoths in North America south of the ice.

3 thoughts on “North American mammoths, new study

  1. Pingback: Mammoth bone found on Texel island beach | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Strange mammoth discovered in California, USA | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: 14 extinct animal discoveries in Siberian permafrost | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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