Wildlife conservation victories and problems


This video says about itself:

8 March 2014

The Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is a leopard subspecies native to the Primorye region of southeastern Russia and Jilin Province of northeast China, and is classified as Critically Endangered since 1996 by IUCN. Only 14–20 adults and 5–6 cubs were counted in a census in 2007, with a total of 19–26 Amur leopards extant in the wild.

Footage from BBC’s “Planet Earth”.

Music by Yo-yo Ma: “Desert Capriccio”.

From the Wildlife Conservation Society in the USA:

WCS has been in the conservation business for over a century – and we’ve found the key to rebuilding animal populations is to preserve what land they have left… and fiercely defend it on their behalf. Our approach works. We’ve helped dramatically rebuild wildlife populations around the world:

  • Tigers once again live freely in India’s Western Ghats Mountains – in large part because of a massive community effort. Villagers voluntarily moved away from tiger habitats, community members became vigilant conservationists, and the government cracked down on poachers. And now there are 300% more wild tigers than 25 years ago. Amazing.
  • Our work to protect elephants in their habitats is our best hope for saving elephants. Despite declining numbers across Africa, elephant populations are actually increasing in Uganda, thanks to crackdowns on poachers in Murchison Falls, Queen Elizabeth, and Kidepo Valley National Parks. Improved protection of these lands has created safe havens for elephants to live peacefully.
  • The most endangered big cat in the world has a newly protected home in Russia. WCS helped establish the Land of the Leopard National Park – preserving a critical 60% of the Amur leopard‘s habitat. The program has been so successful that there are plans to reintroduce the Amur leopard in the Far East Lazo region of Russia – where the leopards have been absent for decades.
  • The second most endangered turtle is back on the road to recovery in Myanmar. The Burmese Roofed Terrapin was thought to be extinct until a small population was found in the ponds of a pagoda. In 2007, we started an ambitious program to protect wild nests and hatch eggs in captivity. And earlier this year, we started releasing them back into their old habitat.

These are tremendous victories for animals and for people like you and me who deeply care about their future. But sadly, for every victory we celebrate, dozens of other threats to endangered animals loom.

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