Bird migration changes by climate change


This video is about female and male stonechats.

The Dutch Sovon ornithologists reported on 11 December 2015 about consequences of climate change for birds wintering in the Netherlands.

The numbers of hooded crows and twites wintering in the Netherlands have diminished greatly compared to decades ago. Probably because of climate change, stopping their autumn migration already when they are still north or east of the Netherlands.

Many redwings and fieldfares still winter in the Netherlands, but their numbers are diminishing as well. Redwing numbers in winter in Denmark are going up; many of these birds are not flying further south now.

Global warming also means some species are seen more often in winter in the Netherlands. These include green sandpipers and water pipits which used to winter farther to the south. Some chiffchafs and stonechats, Dutch breeding birds, now no longer go south in autumn.

New study confirms common birds are powerful indicators of threats from climate change. From Europe to the US the trends match as scientists expected, the data showing coherent and substantial changes in detriment to cold-adapted species: here.

4 thoughts on “Bird migration changes by climate change

    • I think it differs per species. Some species may benefit as their migration jouneys will become shorter.

      However, Arctic and Antarctic species won’t be able to get closer to the poles, and may be in big trouble, like polar bears etc.

      Like

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