Bird migration, new research


This video says about itself:

Physics of Bird Migration

29 April 2013

It is spring and we went to check out the migratory birds returning from their winter grounds. It is pretty incredible to think that some of them have crossed deserts and oceans on their journeys, and they still manage to find their way back to the same locations every year.

For example, did you know that the Arctic Tern is the World Record holder when it comes to migration amongst birds? It spends Northern Hemisphere summers in the Arctic and then for winter it flies all the way to the Antarctic! Absolutely crazy to think that in one year it has seen more of the world than most of us will in a lifetime. In this week’s video we take a look at the physics behind a few of the adaptations that the birds have evolved to be able to perform these annual migrations. Enjoy!

Produced by: Jonas Stenstrom

Filming help by: Louise Fornander & John-Mehdi Ghaddas

From the Annual Review of Physiology (2015):

The Neural Basis of Long-Distance Navigation in Birds

Abstract

Migratory birds can navigate over tens of thousands of kilometers with an accuracy unobtainable for human navigators. To do so, they use their brains. In this review, we address how birds sense navigation- and orientation-relevant cues and where in their brains each individual cue is processed. When little is currently known, we make educated predictions as to which brain regions could be involved.

We ask where and how multisensory navigational information is integrated and suggest that the hippocampus could interact with structures that represent maps and compass information to compute and constantly control navigational goals and directions. We also suggest that the caudolateral nidopallium could be involved in weighing conflicting pieces of information against each other, making decisions, and helping the animal respond to unexpected situations. Considering the gaps in current knowledge, some of our suggestions may be wrong. However, our main aim is to stimulate further research in this fascinating field. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physiology Volume 78 is February 10, 2016. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.

3 thoughts on “Bird migration, new research

  1. Pingback: More migratory bird conservation needed | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: No new blog posts, will re-start soon! | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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