Singing Beethoven for refugees


This video was recorded on 31 October 2015 in Paddepoel shopping center in Groningen city, the Netherlands.

The local orchestra KamerFilharmonie Der Aa, and local choirs Braga and Sica played Beethoven‘s Ode an die Freude.

This was a pro-refugee concert; all money collected was for helping refugees.

There is more pro-refugee music for a choir in the Netherlands: written recently by composer Willem Jeths, with a text by poet Rodaan al Galidi, a refugee from Iraq living in the Netherlands.

Fidelio is animated by the ideals of the Enlightenment. It was composed in the midst of the upheavals and the upsurge unleashed by the French Revolution. It stands alongside Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, with its world-famous choral finale, as a moving musical expression of “liberty, equality, fraternity.” Director Claus Guth and the others responsible for the latest Salzburg production are not interested in this theme. Guth has imposed an entirely different conception. As we shall explain in more detail below, the director turns away from the realities and struggles that engaged Beethoven, substituting a purely psychological and neo-Freudian conception. The result is an oddly schizophrenic production at best, with the glorious music and theme of Fidelio undermined if not contradicted by a set and a directorial artistic idea that belong to a different opera: here.

2 thoughts on “Singing Beethoven for refugees

  1. Pingback: London police ban Jamaican music | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Classical musician Leonard Bernstein’s centenary | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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