Hummingbird webcam in Texas, USA


This 2010 from the USA says about itself:

Each September hummingbirds swarm on my feeders, fatten up and then take off from Lake Jackson, Texas across the Gulf of Mexico on their non stop flight into Mexico and beyond for the winter. The hummingbirds were mainly Ruby-Throated hummers with a few Black-Chinned Hummers. The wings of a hummingbird beat at approximately 78 strokes per second, and during courtship may beat up to 200 times per second. Hummingbirds obtain energy from nectar and insects. They digest 100% of the sugar in the nectar, and they get proteins, fats, and minerals from insects. The migrating Hummingbirds eliminated the mosquitoes in my yard. They earned their keep in sugar cost this year.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

High in the mountains of West Texas, the hummingbird migration is in full swing and we’ve got a front row seat

September 24, 2015

A Hummingbird Extravaganza

We’ve been working with the researchers at the nonprofit West Texas Avian Research to install a cam at one of their hummingbird banding sites, and now you can watch all of the frenetic hummingbird action in high-definition 1080p (watch cam). Over a dozen species have been seen at this site nestled in the Davis Mountains, attracted to the surrounding habitat and to the 24 Perky Pet Grand Master hummingbird feeders used by the monitoring project.

Thanks to our sponsor Perky Pet, we’ll be bringing these views of hummingbirds to you during daylight hours until the last hummingbirds move through, likely in late October. The most common species you’ll see during this time include Rufous, Broad-tailed, and Black-chinned hummingbirds, as well as rarities like Lucifer, White-eared, and Magnificent hummingbirds! Check out the “Species Info” tab beneath the live view for more information on all of the species you might see while watching, and keep in mind that fall can be a challenging time to correctly identify all of the juveniles mixed in with females.

22 thoughts on “Hummingbird webcam in Texas, USA

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