Stop bird killing in the Mediteranean


This video says about itself:

Stop Illegal Bird Hunting In Malta

13 April 2015

Every year countless rare and protected birds are shot out of the sky in Malta, while on migration.

For many years, BirdLife Malta has been working to stop this senseless killing. Every spring and autumn, our volunteers are active in the countryside to monitor and attempt to prevent illegal hunting.

Coordinating these efforts is extremely expensive. We need vital funds to purchase suitable vehicles, surveillance and monitoring equipment, and to train our volunteers.

With your help, we can stop this illegal killing of birds on Malta.

From BirdLife:

Extent of illegal killing of birds in the Mediterranean revealed in BirdLife report

By Finlay Duncan, Fri, 21/08/2015 – 17:00

BirdLife International’s first review into the illegal killing of birds in the Mediterranean has been published – and it’s uncovered the shocking death toll suffered by a number of the region’s species.

Unlawfully shot, trapped or even glued: the review estimates 25 million birds are being killed illegally each year. With the help of BirdLife Partners, a list of the ten Mediterranean countries with the highest number of birds thought to be killed each year has been compiled. The review lays bare the areas where conservation efforts need to be stepped up.

Countries currently hit by conflict, such as Syria and Libya, do feature highly in the rankings, but so do some European nations too. Italy comes second only to Egypt for the estimated mean number of illegal killings each year. Meanwhile, the Famagusta area of Cyprus has the unenviable position of being the single worst location in the Mediterranean under the same criteria.

Other European countries featuring in the top 10 are Greece, France, Croatia and Albania. Despite not ranking in the top 10 overall, Malta sees the region’s highest estimated number of birds illegally killed per square kilometre.

For BirdLife, the review further demonstrates why the Birds Directive, currently under examination by the European Commission, should be better implemented, rather than re-opened.

The review also exposes some of the common methods of killing in use across the Mediterranean; which include illegal shooting, capture in nets and recordings of bird sounds used to lure them to illegal trapping locations. Many of the cruel methods used, such as lime sticks that glue the birds to branches, cause considerable suffering before resulting in the bird’s death.

Figures suggest Eurasian Chaffinch comes top of the ‘kill list’ (an estimated 2.9 million are killed each year), with Eurasian Blackcap (1.8 million), Common Quail (1.6 million) and Song Thrush (1.2 million) making up the rest of the top four. A number of species already listed as ‘Near Threatened’ or ‘Vulnerable’ on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List are also in danger, according to the review.

The review’s publication comes as the British Birdwatching Fair gets underway today (Friday 21 August 2015) at Rutland Water Nature Reserve. It also marks the launch of BirdLife’s new Keeping the Flyway Safe fundraising campaign to help target resources for conservation in the worst affected locations.

Commenting on the publication, BirdLife International CEO, Patricia Zurita, said: “This review shows the gruesome extent to which birds are being killed illegally in the Mediterranean. Populations of some species that were once abundant in Europe are declining, with a number even in free-fall and disappearing altogether.”

“Our birds deserve safer flyways – concluded BirdLife’s CEO – and we want conservation efforts to be increased now, before it’s too late.”

The data in the review previews a scientific paper due to be published soon giving a full assessment of the situation in the Mediterranean.

For a full breakdown of the numbers for each country and species mentioned in this article, please see the review itself here or press release here.

Today in Manila, at CMS COP 12*, the BirdLife Partnership presented its latest publication on the illegal killing of birds in Europe – ‘The Killing 2.0 – A View to a Kill’: here.

6 thoughts on “Stop bird killing in the Mediteranean

  1. Pingback: COP21 Paris conference and birds | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Starling murmuration in London, video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Birds in Libya, new book | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Beautiful birds in Belarus | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.