British sedge warblers, other birds, prepare for autumn migration


This video from England says about itself:

Sedge Warbler

This clip was taken along side one of my photographic projects at Cley next to the sea, Norfolk, England, recorded during July 2009 at 05:30am.

From the Daily Express in Britain:

Ingham’s World: Feeding frenzy for Britain’s birds

DEEP in the reedbeds yesterday noisy little brown birds were busy embarking on a binge diet whose scale is normally seen only at the buffets of cruise ships.

By John Ingham

PUBLISHED: 09:28, Fri, Aug 14, 2015 | UPDATED: 09:46, Fri, Aug 14, 2015

Sedge warblers, whose manic song rattles over wetlands in spring, will nearly double their weight over the next three weeks in a frenzy of feasting.

They pile on the ounces by devouring aphids, storing up enough fuel for a longhaul migration south of the Sahara.

While many of you will still be looking forward to your summer holidays, for many of our birds it is autumn already.

Piratical skuas are streaming across the North Sea having quit their northern breeding grounds.

The vast majority of our swifts have lived up to their tag as the last summer visitors to arrive and first to leave.

Most of the British Trust for Ornithology’s satellite-tagged cuckoos are already south of the Sahara while the first pied flycatchers, redstarts and wheatears are gathering on the coast, preparing to head south for the winter.

Few natural feats come as close to animal magic as migration, a marvel of instinct and experience which lets birds from swallows to ospreys boost their chances of survival.

And the RSPB magazine Nature’s Home reveals just how spectacular it can be.

This autumn about 1.5 billion birds will fly south from Europe and Asia’s western fringes to seek refuge in Africa.

Similar numbers will be on the move across the Americas, Asia and Australia. Between now and next spring our Arctic terns will clock up 25,000 miles as they head south for the Antarctic summer before returning here to breed.

Some species, such as swifts, will range widely, never once landing between quitting the nest and their return, sleeping on the wing above Africa’s jungles.

But wood warblers from Britain’s oakwoods will behave like holiday homers, returning to the same clump of trees in such countries as Burkina Faso. Others have a strict gender divide.

Dunlins – little waders – reach the UK from Greenland in three waves, females in July, males around now and the young next month.

As for sedge warblers, they store enough fuel from their food orgy to make the journey south across the Sahara in just one hop. So for sedge warblers greed is good.

No need to worry if the birds seem to have quit your garden. At this time of year the adults are moulting and skulking and there’s plenty of natural food in the woods and hedgerows.

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12 thoughts on “British sedge warblers, other birds, prepare for autumn migration

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