Second snow leopard gets collar in Nepal


This video says about itself:

4 June 2015

A second snow leopard was collared in Kangchenjunga by the government of Nepal, supported by WWF, National Trust for Nature Conservation, Kangchenjunga Conservation Area Project, Kangchenjunga Conservation Area Management Council and local citizen scientists, on May 21, 2105.

The 5-year-old male was fitted with a collar that has satellite-GPS technology which will help conservationists track their movement patterns, habitat use and preferences to inform strategies like transboundary efforts to save this elusive species. The snow leopard was named “Omikhangri” after a mountain near the collaring location.

Nepal collared the first snow leopard using satellite-GPS technology in November 2013.

From Wildlife Extra:

Second snow leopard successfully collared in Nepal

A snow leopard has been successfully collared in the shadow of Nepal’s Kangchenjunga, the world’s second highest mountain just a month after the country was hit with a devastating earthquake. This is the second snow leopard to be collared in Nepal since 2013.

The snow leopard, which is an adult male approximately five years of age weighing 41 kg, was and fitted with a GPS-satellite collar and released back into the wild. Data received from the satellite collar will enable conservationists to identify critical habitats for the elusive species, including transboundary links across India and China.

“Nepal is proud to be at the forefront of global scientific efforts to get a better understanding of one of nature’s most elusive species,” stated Tika Ram Adhikari, Director General of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation. “Our ability to repeat the success we had with the first collaring in 2013 during this most difficult period for the country is a testament to the commitment towards conservation of the government as well as the people of Nepal.”

The collaring expedition was led by the Government of Nepal in partnership with WWF, National Trust for Nature Conservation, Kangchenjunga Conservation Area Project, Kangchenjunga Conservation Area Management Council and citizen scientists from the local Snow Leopard Conservation Committee. The latter were especially vital in helping identify snow leopard hotspots and managing local logistics.

“As a science-based conservation organization, WWF was delighted to partner with the government of Nepal on applying new technologies to help us gain a better understanding of snow leopards,” said Anil Manandhar, Country Representative of WWF-Nepal. “We continue to be inspired by our grassroots partners in Kangchenjunga—one of the poorest and least accessible places in Nepal—to save snow leopards and other magnificent species that could easily be lost without their stewardship. This project is a powerful example of what we can make possible together.”

The existing snow leopard conservation projects in Kangchenjunga Conservation Area include snow leopard monitoring using camera traps and prey-base monitoring with the partnership of local citizen scientists and Snow Leopard Conservation Committees, a population genetic study using fecal DNA, and a livestock insurance scheme built at reducing human-snow leopard conflict.

There are an estimated 350-590 snow leopards in Nepal according to 2009 population data on the species.

SNOW LEOPARDS ARE INCREASINGLY ENDANGERED Thanks, climate change. [HuffPost]

Hunters Become Conservationists in the Fight to Protect the Snow Leopard. A pioneering program recruits locals as rangers in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan, where the elusive cat is battling for survival: here.
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

11 thoughts on “Second snow leopard gets collar in Nepal

  1. Pingback: Biologist George Schaller gets medal | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Amur tiger back in the wild | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Lions back in Rwanda after fifteen years | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: British rugby players against wildlife crime | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Snow leopard video | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Four baby snow leopards in Mongolia | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: American rare carnivores’ winter footprints research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: American mule deer adapt to wolves | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  9. Pingback: Snow leopard conservation in Nepal | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  10. Pingback: Pine martens do social distancing | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  11. Pingback: Wolves in Yellowstone, USA, new study | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.