Rare mosses discovery in Dutch Brabant


This video says about itself:

This is part two of my guide to mosses and other bryophytes. Part two provides a general introduction to mosses and how to identify them.

Translated from the Dutch BLWG bryologists:

Sunday, April 26th, 2015

In West Brabant there is a special forest reserve, the estate Mattemburgh. The forest on the estate was planted in 1880. For many decades, there has been no management in the forest, so many fallen trees are found there. On the rotting wood moss experts of KNNV Roosendaal found last year three nationally rare mosses: rustwort, Silesian feather-moss and Riccardia latifrons. Riccardia latifrons is very rare and was so far only known from forests in the Veluwe region.

Walking through the forest, one sees a wilderness of mushrooms, ferns and blueberries. But particularly striking are the many fallen and dead trees, especially pines. Recently, they attracted many mosses.

The common liverwort is a living link to the transition from marine algae to land plants. Biologists have analyzed the genome sequence of the common liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) to identify genes and gene families that were deemed crucial to plant evolution and have been conserved over millions of years and across plant lineages: here.

Liverwort plants contain a painkiller similar to the one in marijuana. The THC-like substance may have medical benefits minus the same kind of high. By Jennifer Leman, 5:34pm, October 24, 2018.

32 thoughts on “Rare mosses discovery in Dutch Brabant

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