Fossil haddock bones on Dutch beaches


This video from the USA says about itself:

27 April 2011

Kemmerer, Wyoming boasts the site of the largest concentration of [Eocene] fossil fish.

On Dutch beaches, like of Texel island and the Zandmotor, many small fossil fish bones, cleithrum bones, were found. Recent research found out these bones belonged to Melanogrammus aeglefinus, the haddock, a species still living today.

The bones are about 100,000 years old, from the Eemien, the time before the last ice age. Last month, the research was published in Cranium journal.

In Belgium, cleithrum bones have been found of an older haddock species, now extinct, from the Pliocene age. That species is called Melanogrammus conjunctus.

A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea. The findings showed that haddock larvae orient toward the northwest using Earth’s magnetic field: here.

5 thoughts on “Fossil haddock bones on Dutch beaches

  1. Pingback: Mastodon discovery in Michigan backyard | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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  4. Pingback: Amber discovery on Texel island beach | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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