Chevron Ecuadorean Amazon pollution court case


This video says about itself:

Amazon Jungle, Ecuador, Cuyabeno National Park

7 December 2011

Cuyabeno National Park, located deep withing the Amazon jungle of NE Ecuador, is unique in that it is an inundated jungle. Huge trees with giant winged trunks protrude from the black waters of the Laguna Grande (Grand Lagoon), home to steely-jawed piranhas. Hundreds of species of exotic birds like the Hoatzin and Russet-backed Oropendola wing overhead, while an incredible variety of primates fly through the trees or scramble across branches. Even the ground teems with activity as leaf-cutter ants tote loads ten times their size. I stayed at Cuyabeno Lodge on the Grand Lagoon, an incredible lodge that is also eco-friendly.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Texaco pollution villagers take case to Canada court

Saturday 13th December 2014

Lawyers for a group of Ecuadorian villagers asked Canada’s High Court on Thursday to grant their clients access to enforce a £6 billion Ecuadorian judgement against oil giant Chevron for rainforest damage.

Lawyers have quarrelled for several years in several countries over who’s responsible for pollution in the rain forest.

The villagers’ lawyers are arguing that the case should be heard in Canadian courts because Chevron has a Canadian subsidiary.

In February 2011, an Ecuadorian judge issued an £11.5bn judgement against Chevron in a lawsuit brought on behalf of 30,000 villagers.

It was for environmental damage caused by Texaco during its operation of an oil consortium from 1972 to 1990.

Ecuador’s highest court last year upheld the verdict but reduced the amount to about £6bn.

Chevron, which now has no assets in Ecuador, has simply shrugged off the case.

The company is being sued because it bought Texaco.

But it insists that a 1998 agreement Texaco signed with Ecuador absolves it of liability.

Chevron … argued procedurally that allowing the action to proceed would violate a principle known as the “corporate veil,” which says that subsidiaries are separate entities from their corporate parents and are not liable for actions of the parents — a convenient legal fiction which allows widespread impunity.

See also here.

6 thoughts on “Chevron Ecuadorean Amazon pollution court case

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  6. Dear friends,

    Oil giant Chevron dumped billions of gallons of deadly chemicals in the Ecuadorian Amazon, leaving behind rivers full of toxic waste, decimating wildlife and spreading cancer and death in indigenous communities.

    They’ve never cleaned it up! But Chevron’s impunity could finally end if we persuade just one man to do the right thing.

    Chevron’s top stockholder is a US retirement fund whose chair has challenged corporate abuse before, and his customers are part of this community! If we flood him with support in the next 48 hours he could tip a historic vote — at Chevron’s shareholder meeting in days. Add your name now:

    Join the Call for Justice for the Amazon’s Chernobyl

    The battle between Chevron and Ecuador’s indigenous people has been waged for decades, becoming a landmark case globally. Over 20 judges in Ecuador and Canada, including the Supreme Courts of both countries, have sided with the Ecuadorians in their pursuit to hold Chevron to account for dumping toxic waste in the water that people drink.

    A win against Chevron could open a new era where major corporations are finally held accountable for their crimes!

    That’s where investor powerhouse Vanguard and its powerful chairman comes in. Vanguard owns a large share of Chevron, and has just recently voted against management on climate-related resolutions at ExxonMobil, criticising executive pay at Viacom and pushing big banks on gender diversity. With Chevron’s shareholder meeting in days, over 30 major investors are already calling on the company to settle the case.

    Vanguard Chairman Bill McNabb is a father of four who’s called on CEOs to be a “force for good.” Getting him on board could tip the balance toward a majority vote against Chevron’s recalcitrant management! Add your name now and we’ll deliver our appeal directly to the chairman, right before the meeting:

    Join the Call for Justice for the Amazon’s Chernobyl

    Avaazers have campaigned against Chevron before, delivering letters to US senators, and filing legal briefings in court cases with partners. This is an incredible opportunity to get Chevron to finally clean up its toxic mess … and open up a new era of investor-driven social change!

    With hope and determination,

    Joseph, Pascal, Mike, Alice, Emma, Ricken and the entire Avaaz team

    More information:

    Shareholders Push New Chevron CEO For Answers on Ecuador
    http://csrstrategygroup.com/shareholders-push-new-chevron-ceo-for-answers-on-ecuador/

    Tell Chevron’s New CEO to Finally Clean up Ecuador! (Amazon Watch)
    https://amazonwatch.org/take-action/tell-chevrons-new-ceo-to-finally-clean-up-ecuador

    In the Vanguard: Fund giants urge CEOs to be ‘Force for Good’
    https://www.ft.com/content/a28203d8-067d-11e8-9650-9c0ad2d7c5b5

    Investor Letter on Risks from Ecuador Litigation

    Click to access Chevron-Investor-Letter-2018.pdf

    Exxon Mobil loses support of a powerful voice in climate change policy
    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/31/investing-power-vanguard-votes-against-exxon-mobil-on-climate-change.html

    Chevron’s “Amazon Chernobyl” in Ecuador: The Real Irrefutable Truths About the Company’s Toxic Dumping and Fraud (Huffington Post)
    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-donziger/chevrons-amazon-chernobyl_b_7435926.html

    Like

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