Turkey, Syria, Kurdistan and ISIS


This video says about itself:

Turkey: Kobane protests rage in Istanbul, death toll rises to 25

9 October 2014

Chaos swept Istanbul as clashes between pro-Kurdish protesters and police intensified, on Thursday evening.

Protesters, who were demonstrating over Turkey’s inaction in Kobane, threw fireworks while police retaliated with tear gas.

Kobane, a Syrian Kurdish town near the Turkish border has been besieged by the self proclaimed Islamic State (formerly ISIS, ISIL), however Turkey have not yet intervened.

At least 25 demonstrators have so far died in the protests.

By Iskender Dogu in Turkey:

Erdogan helped us but we don’t need him anymore’

Thursday 16th October 2014

After years of supporting Islamist fighters, Turkey now faces blowback from the Syrian civil war, writes Iskender Dogu from the Syrian-Turkish border

THE last glimpse I catch of Kobane, before we are forced off the hill overlooking the town by Turkish soldiers in their armoured personnel carriers, are two pillars of smoke rising from the city centre.

Just minutes before, two loud explosions could be heard, after which clouds of dust and debris emerged from between the buildings in the town, just across the border from Turkey.

Despite the fact that coalition jets and drones are circling overhead, invisible to the naked eye but clearly recognisable by their humming sounds, it is clear that these were not air strikes — the explosions appeared in an area that is still under control of the People’s and Women’s Defence Forces (YPG/YPJ), and the smoke looks different from the kind that normally follows air strikes.

That leaves only one possibility — these were the explosions of two more Isis suicide car bombs unsuccessfully attempting to break Kurdish defence lines.

Immediately after the second car explodes — either detonated by Isis or neutralised by the YPG/YPJ — half a dozen Turkish APCs come rushing from the border towards the hill where foreign journalists and local observers have gathered to keep track of the situation in the city.

The soldiers command everyone, including the media, to leave the viewpoint immediately. No explanation is given, and we quickly return to our car to make our way back to Suruc, the Turkish border town just eight kilometres away.

A few days ago, in the bus back to Urfa from Suruc, a man started talking to me. Introducing himself as Muslum, a 31-year-old Kurdish activist from around Suruc, he told me about his brother, who is currently fighting with the YPG in Kobane.

Muslum hasn’t spoken to him for over five months, as any contact with Turkish volunteers fighting with the YPG in Rojava would put him and other family members back home at risk of arrest by Turkish authorities.

“He is fighting for the canton system, for the freedom of the Kurdish people and for the freedom of all people,” Muslum says. “The independence of Rojava is a big problem for Turkey, because its canton system is an example of what the future of Kurdistan could look like.”

Muslum fully supports and is proud of his brother. He himself is no stranger to political activism either, having spent three years in prison for his political involvement in the Kurdish struggle. He was deported to Greek Cyprus after his release and was only allowed to return to Turkey on the condition that he would not engage in politics anymore. This doesn’t seem to bother him too much.

“The government calls me a terrorist because I speak at protests that demand democracy for the Kurdish people. They don’t like anything that has to do with freedom for the Kurdish people. But I don’t listen! Every day I am active in the Kurdish struggle. All the people here are like me.”

The Turkish government keeps track of all Kurdish activists, and Muslum’s name appears on a special blacklist, which means that every time he gets checked by the police there is a chance they will take him down to the station.

After the funeral of seven YPG/YPJ fighters whose bodies were brought from Kobane to Turkey in order to be properly buried here, a large crowd gathers in the local headquarters of the pro-Kurdish Democratic Regions Party (DBP).

While everyone is drinking tea and watching the latest news from Kobane on a Kurdish channel, Ayse Muslim — the wife of Saleh Muslim, the co-chairwoman of the Democratic Union Party (PYD) and de-facto leader of Rojava — walks in and starts shouting angrily at the men: “What are you doing here, watching television and drinking tea while our comrades in Kobane are fighting for your freedom? Go to the border to show your solidarity!”

Later, in the village of Measer, where hundreds have flocked to watch the siege of Kobane unfold, I sit down with some men at the local mosque to discuss their views on Rojava’s canton system and Ocalan’s theory of democratic autonomy. Among them is the brother of one of PKK’s highest commanders, who is happy to share some of his ideas.

“The canton system and the project of democratic autonomy is not just a Kurdish project,” he says. “The idea is that it facilitates the communal life of people of different religious, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds.

“Yes, the PKK fought for national independence before, but this was in the period of the cold war. After the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the communist-socialist bloc, we have come to realise that one country with one government is not the right solution.”

With the explosions in Kobane clearly audible in the background, more and more men join the discussion. “Last year Barzani [the conservative leader of Iraqi Kurdistan] called for the unification of all Kurdish people in one single country,” one man adds.

“But the PKK disagrees with this plan, because such a state will eventually be no different from the Turkish republic. The Kurds have many different religions and we speak many different languages. How could we unite ourselves under one single government?”

The men agree that, given the strength of the Turkish state and military, the widespread adoption of a canton system like Rojava’s is still far off. Still they see democratic autonomy as the only real alternative. “We don’t need professional politicians, but rather want the people to make decisions about their own lives, based on consensus and by means of local councils.”

Several days ago, Abdullah Ocalan, the jailed leader of the PKK, presented the Turkish state with a deadline to act on peace with the country’s Kurdish population.

“We can await a resolution till October 15, after which there is nothing we can do,” his statement read. “They (the Turkish authorities) are talking about resolution and negotiation but there exists no such thing. This is an artificial situation. We will not be able to continue anymore.”

The men of Measer fully support Ocalan’s statement because they are fed up with being stalled by the Turkish government, which keeps bringing up the issue of the Kurdish peace process every time an election peeks around the corner, but when pushes comes to shove, it consistently fails to act upon its promises.

They believe Ocalan set the deadline so that the implementation of promises made in the negotiations so far can no longer be postponed.

“Kobane is everything,” the PKK commander’s brother states. “Kobane is the red line — for the PKK, for Ocalan, for the Kurdish people, for everyone. Without Kobane we can’t talk about anything.”

The general opinion of the Kurds and their supporters here at the border is that the Turkish government has had a hand in Isis’s assault on Kobane. This rumour was confirmed by a member of Isis with whom we spoke on the phone, a mere 200 metres from the border with Syria.

My friend Murat and I were walking through the fields when we met a man who explained to us that he had just escaped from Kobane.

He told us how, two days before, he had tried to call a friend who was fighting with the Women’s Defence Forces.

But instead of his friend answering, an unknown man picked up the phone and told him that his friend was dead — killed by Isis — and that this phone now belonged to him.

Murat encouraged the man to try to call the number again, and after it rang a number of times, the same man picked up.

Our friend spoke to the Isis fighter for a while, in Arabic, and then asked him: “how is your friend Erdogan doing?”

The reply confirmed what many here have been suspecting all along: “Erdogan has helped us a lot in the past. He has given us Kobane. But now we don’t need him anymore. After Kobane, Turkey is next!”

The PKK’s October 15 deadline has arrived, and with the border still closed for any material or logistical support for the Kurdish defenders of the city, the likelihood of a new civil war in Turkey becomes greater every day.

The men of Measer would have preferred a political solution over violence, but realise that if the Turkish government continues to stand by idly, blocking the border as their comrades in Kobane are being slaughtered at the hands of Isis, they will not be left with much choice.

It therefore appears that the Syrian civil war is rapidly spilling over into Turkey, not least because the majority of YPG fighters in Kobane are reportedly from the PKK, aiding their Syrian comrades in the fight against Isis.

As news emerges of fresh Turkish air strikes on PKK positions in the south-east of the country, it is clear that the ceasefire is rapidly breaking down.

Unless the Turkish government suddenly makes a dramatic turn, opening the border crossing to Kobanê and supporting the Kurdish resistance against Isis, it will be difficult to prevent a further escalation of violence in the region.

Iskender Dogu is an Istanbul-based freelance writer, activist and an editor for Roar Magazine at www.roarmag.org. Follow him on Twitter via @Le_Frique.

The Turkish government is demanding that the war be explicitly directed against the Syrian regime of President Bashar al-Assad, as well as ISIS, and the establishment of US-backed no-fly and buffer zones inside Syria. Turkish security forces massed on the border near Kobane have restricted support to the YPG, concerned that its victory could encourage the PKK within Turkey: here.

In a revealing report commissioned by the Obama administration, the US Central Intelligence Agency called into question Washington’s policy of arming Syrian “rebels,” pointing out that such operations in the past had seldom proven successful: here.

A force of 600 Turkish troops entered northern Syria Saturday in the first-ever incursion by Turkey since the Syrian civil war began in 2011. The convoy of nearly 200 military vehicles, including 39 tanks and 57 armored cars, evacuated 40 Turkish soldiers guarding the tomb of Suleyman Shah, an ancestor of the Ottoman dynasty that ruled Turkey for 500 years: here.

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  7. Local officials held for sedition

    Turkey: Four prosecutors and a former commander have been arrested for halting two convoys of trucks suspected of smuggling weapons into Syria early last year.

    The convoys were organised by intelligence officials who claim immunity from arrest under the law.

    Warrants for the five provincial officials were issued on Wednesday on charges of trying to overthrow the government in conspiracy with US-based clergyman Fetullah Gulen.

    http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/a-24b6-World-in-brief-8th-May-2015#.VUxJV5N8oTs

    Like

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