Save Europe’s vultures and eagles


This video says about itself:

11 February 2013

This video tells the story of a poisoned Bonelli’s Eagle that was rehabilitated in North Cyprus by a group of local conservationists who have been tracking the status of the species in their country.

From BirdLife:

By Luca Bonaccorsi, Thu, 25/09/2014 – 14:59

After months of wrestling, the European Commission has given mandate to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to assess the risks to vulture populations of the use of veterinary medicines containing diclofenac. This represents a major breakthrough and opens the door for the European ban of the killer drug that wiped out entire vulture populations in Asia. BirdLife International and the Vulture Conservation Foundation appeal to all parties involved to submit scientific evidence to the EMA by 10 October 2014.

Diclofenac is a veterinary anti-inflammatory drug that kills vultures and eagles – in India it caused a 99% decline of a number of vulture species there, before eventually being banned in four countries in the region. Quite incredibly, veterinary diclofenac has now been allowed to be used on farm animals in Europe – in Estonia, Italy and Spain for cattle, pigs and horses, and in the Czech Republic and Latvia for horses only. The drug has been marketed by an Italian company named FATRO, and was allowed using loopholes in the EU guidelines to assess risk of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.

The European Medicines Agency has now opened a public consultation on the matter, directed at all professional bodies with information about scavenging birds, veterinary practices and the disposal of animal by-products. With this decision, the European Commission acknowledges the facts raised by BirdLife International and the Vulture Conservation Foundation, who are leading an international campaign to ban veterinary diclofenac in Europe.

José Tavares, Executive Director of the VCF states: “It is impossible to leave this drug out there, and it’s the time for the EU to acknowledge the reality on the ground in countries like Italy and Spain. Even if there was a strict veterinary prescription system – and this is not the case – it would still be impossible for the veterinary managing the drug to oversee the disposal of all the dead animals. In Spain when pigs, lambs and goats die in open fields they are often reached by vultures even before farmers are aware of it.”

Iván Ramírez, Head of Conservation for Europe and Central Asia at BirdLife International says: “We welcome the decision, and thank our BirdLife Partners and supporters. Our vulture experts are working on our reply to EMA, but it is crucial that we take any single opportunity to call for the immediate ban of this product. There are safe alternatives and we have already seen how dangerous veterinary diclofenac is for vultures. We won’t stop until a European ban is implemented”.

This video is called Stop Vulture Poisoning Now.

New research published by a Spanish-British-American team in Conservation Biology documents a suspected flunixin poisoning of a wild Eurasian griffon vulture from Spain: here.

8 thoughts on “Save Europe’s vultures and eagles

  1. Pingback: Indian vultures news update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. “Rescuing vultures from a wipe-out.”
    October 15 2014.
    IOL newsletter

    “Vultures mate for life and lay only one egg each season a year. Naturally, chances of a chick surviving to breeding age (seven years) are slim; in our modern world they become even smaller. ”
    “It’s becoming hard for a breeding pair to replace themselves in their lifetime, leading to a decline in the population. Losing an adult has even more devastating effects, as a chick with a single parent cannot survive, plus, the mate that loses a partner may not breed.”

    Visit http://www.vulpro.com for more about VulPro.

    http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/science/environment/rescuing-vultures-from-a-wipe-out-1.1765183?utm_medium=email&utm_source=IOL&utm_campaign=Google+unveils+new+Nexus+devices%3B+Ebola+could+trigger+food+crisis+-+20+Oct+2014+-+16%3A03&utm_term=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.iol.co.za%2Frescuing-vultures-from-a-wipe-out-1.1765183#.VEUWNmccTmI

    Like

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