Moroccan bird news


This video says about itself:

A Rüppell’s Vulture was recovered in northern Morocco. After a period of rehabilitation, it was wing-tagged and released at Jbel Moussa (September 2016).

From Moroccan Birds blog:

Saturday, May 24, 2014

3 Rüppell’s Vultures at Tétouan (24-05-2014)

Live from the field at Tetouan, northern Morocco

Now: we are surrounded by 3 Rüppell’s Vultures and 32 Griffon Vultures roosting near Tetouan (just 5 Km north of the town). A local Black-winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus) mobbing the vultures.

Details later. Rachid & Mohamed

The importance of Fouwarate marshland (Northwest of Morocco) for wintering and breeding of Ardeidae.

Abstract:

Due to its location within the East-Atlantic flyway, the Site of Biological and Ecological Interest commonly known as SIBE of Marshland of Fouwarate is considered as a key stopover area for migratory waterbirds. An ornithological monitoring carried out during a complete hydrological cycle (2009-2010) showed that the site encompasses eight Ardeidae species of which five are breeding. Four species have an unfavorable status in the territory of European Union and five species have patrimonial value in Morocco. In addition, the wintering numbers of two species exceed the threshold of 1% of the regional population (Ramsar criteria) while six species exceed the threshold of 1% of the national population. This attributes to this site a great national and international importance for the conservation for the conservation of threatened waterbirds, not to mention the role it can play in promoting environmental education and ecotourism in the region. However, the wetland is under high pressures due to different human activities (embankment, agriculture and industry), which requires urgent actions to protect and conserve its ecological values: here.

Study of the migratory waders phenology in the lagoon and salines of Sidi Moussa (Morocco).

Abstract:

Monthly counts of waders were conducted from March 2010 to February 2012 in Sidi Moussa lagoon and adjacent salines. In total 24 species were identified, including three regular breeding species in the site (Glareola pratincola, Charadrius alexandrinus and Himantopus himantopus). The most abundant species are Calidris alpina, Charadrius hiaticula, Charadrius alexandrinus, Pluvialis squatarola, Himantopus himantopus and Tringa totanus. The analysis of migration patterns of the species did not show significant variations between years in contrast to the trends in total numbers of waders that showed marked variations between the different seasons of the annual cycle of the species. The highest numbers are recorded during the autumn passage. Numbers will subsequently decrease and stabilize during the wintering season. Prenuptial movements are not well detected. A slight increase in numbers was noticed in February marking the beginning of the return passage. Some species can leave on the site small flocks of summering individuals. This is the case of Dunlin which shows a strong correlation with the total numbers and the Redshank with an early summering (May). Both breeding species, Black-winged Stilt and the Kentish Plover evolve differently in the site. When no seasonal variation was noted for the first species, migration passages are well marked for the second and numbers stabilize during the wintering and summering. The Grey Plover numbers noted during the summer show significant differences with those recorded during other seasons of the annual cycle, marked by certain stability. For Ringed Plover, numbers recorded in summer showed significant differences only with those of the autumn passage: here.

Hanane, S. 2014. L’avifaune aquatique de la zone littorale atlantique de Rabat-Bouznika (Maroc): Composition, phénologie et reproduction. Thèse de Doctorat, Université Mohammed V–Agdal, Rabat: here.

Cherkaoui, S. I., Hanane, S., Magri, N., El Agbani, M.-A. & Dakki, M. (2015). Factors influencing species-richness of breeding waterbirds in Moroccan IBA and Ramsar wetlands: a macroecological approach. Wetlands 35(5): 913–922: here.

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