Sunbitterns, tiger heron in Costa Rica


Montezuma's oropendola nesting colony, 17 March 2014

Still 17 March 2014 near the Sarapiqui river in Costa Rica. Not only frogs and spiders there; but, of course, also birds. Like this Montezuma’s oropendola nesting colony.

Montezuma's oropendola male at nesting colony, 17 March 2014

Some oropendola males do their mating season gymnastics performances, while singing their songs.

Montezuma's oropendola male, at nesting colony, 17 March 2014

And a female white-necked jacobin hummingbird.

A yellow-crowned euphonia. And an orange-billed sparrow.

Red-throated ant tanager, 17 March 2014

A male red-throated ant tanager, singing on a branch.

Red-throated ant tanager male, 17 March 2014

Red-throated ant tanager female, 17 March 2014

There was a female as well.

Sunbitterns with fish, 17 March 2014

At the river bank, two rare sunbitterns. One of them catches a fish. It is not as dexterous at swallowing it as real bitterns.

Sun bitterns are called “zonneral”, sun rail, in Dutch. But they are not closely related to either rails or bitterns.

Sarapiqui river, 17 March 2014

We go a bit further along the river.

Pug-nosed anole, 17 March 2014

A lizard on a tree trunk. A pug-nosed anole male?

Fasciated tiger heron, 17 March 2014

A fasciated tiger heron among the rocks.

Fasciated tiger heron catches food, 17 March 2014

It catches food from the river.

Fasciated tiger heron, Sarapiqui river, 17 March 2014

A spotted sandpiper.

A neotropic cormorant flies along.

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9 thoughts on “Sunbitterns, tiger heron in Costa Rica

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