Libya back to monarchy?


This video says about itself:

Old Libyan Monarchy Prince Al Senussi

29 August 2011

‘The Libyan monarchy of Idris, which was based in Benghazi, was installed by the United States and British in the 1950’s to oversee their economic and military interests in North Africa. Libya in 1951, under the leadership of King Idris, officially had the lowest standards of living in the world. The Idris monarchy was overthrown in a bloodless revolution led by Muammar al-Gaddafi in 1969. This led to the American Wheelus Air Base (the largest American base outside of the US at that time) being dismantled and the American and British armed forces stationed in Libya evacuating. The western oil companies were then nationalised.’

In the 1950s and early 1960s, Libya was an absolute monarchy, somewhat like Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Bahrain still today (which explains something about the intervention of the regimes of Qatar, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia in the 2011 bloody war which led to the present bloody chaos in Libya).

In the 1950s and early 1960s, there were British and United States military bases in Libya. The oil wealth of the country was profitable only to foreign multinational corporations and a small clique around the royal family. Most people were analphabetes: education was in dire state. So was public housing (except for royal palaces).

By Asmaa Elourfi, 28 March 2014:

Benghazi — With bloodshed in Libya continuing unabated, some political elites are floating the idea of a constitutional monarchy

How ‘constitutional’? In Bahrain, there is, on paper, a constitution, but that does not stop the country from being a royal dictatorship.

to restore order and unite the country.

“The return of the al-Senussi monarchy is now the solution and guarantee for the return of security and stability to Libya,” Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz said Tuesday (March 25th) at the conclusion of Arab foreign ministers’ preparatory meeting for the 25th Arab League summit.

“Contacts have already been made, and we’re in touch with dignitaries and tribal chiefs in Libya, and also with the grandson of King al-Senussi, Prince Mohammed, who lives overseas,” the minister added.

He noted that the 1951 constitution was being reviewed, adding that many believed it was one of the best in the region and world.

“Many tribal sheikhs who lived under monarchy and know it prefer such a system of government,” he said.

Libyans are mixed over the prospect of a constitutional monarchy. …

In her turn, teacher Hawaa Younes Said, 56, said, “Yes to the return of the prince to govern Cyrenaica so peace and security can prevail… We’ve had enough of this arbitrary rule in the last three years.”

While earlier in this article, there is talk of a monarchy supposedly ‘uniting’ Libya, this interviewee talks about a monarchy only in Cyrenaica, eastern Libya. Cyrenaica has more oil than western Libya. The ex-royal family is originally from Cyrenaica. So, far from uniting Libya, bringing in royals may result in Cyrenaican separatism as an oil monarchy.

Others say the important thing is security for Libya.

“As far as I’m concerned, I accept even Libyan folklore artist Nadia Astar to rule Libya, as long as we get rid of these assassinations, bombings and concerns in the country,” martyrs ministry employee Ali al-Houti, 33, told Magharebia.

Shoulder-launched anti-aircraft missiles flow abroad from Libya: U.N.: here.

Libyan kangaroo court trials begin against Gaddafi’s sons: here.

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3 thoughts on “Libya back to monarchy?

  1. Those who control Libya from exterior sources are able to pay big money to a small elite and finance a repressive regime, is cheaper than giving a share of the money to all people of the Libyan public, ensuring selling military hardware to the regime in exchange for oil and resources.
    Eventually leaving the country bankrupt whilst the inner circle , The Royals, purchase a house in Londons, Mayfair, and parks their ill gotten gains in the stock market or whatever.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Libyan artists in danger | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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