Australian bats’ heatwave problems


This video from Australia says about itself:

‘NO ME, NO TREE! – THE GREY-HEADED FLYING FOX

20 Dec 2012

Grey-headed flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) are highly environmentally significant. Sydney Wildlife carer Sonja Elwood describes their increasingly perilous situation.

From Wildlife Extra:

Australia parks staff give a helping hand to grey-headed flying foxes affected by extreme heat

January 2014: The Australian Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI) and Parks Victoria staff are working alongside dedicated wildlife volunteer groups to monitor and treat grey-headed flying foxes at Yarra Bend Park as the extreme heat wave continues in the country.

Up to 500 flying foxes from the Yarra Bend Park colony have died as a result of heat stress and that number was likely to increase greatly without measures being taken.

DEPI Incident Controller, Mark Winfield, said staff and volunteers were on site doing everything they could to keep the animals cool.

“Grey-headed flying foxes, as native animals, have evolved to deal with very high temperatures but only for short periods of time,” he said. “Heat stress incidents of this scale in the colony do not occur frequently, but into our fourth successive day of extreme heat, we saw the flying foxes really struggling to cope.

“The younger animals are particularly vulnerable to heat stress as they are unable to fly down to the river to drink alone and may just drop from their trees with dehydration and exhaustion.

“Volunteers have been spraying the animals with a fine mist that they can lick off their wings and are also trying to separate them as they tend to bunch up in the heat, which only exacerbates the problem.”

“There is also a vet on site assessing them and providing rehydration when appropriate.”

Over summer the established colony, which can be seen from the Bellbird Picnic area off Yarra Boulevard, can swell to over 30,000 flying foxes.

Members of the public have been advised to avoid contact with stressed, injured or dead flying foxes but to contact DEPI. All wildlife volunteers assisting with the heat stress event are trained and vaccinated.

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3 thoughts on “Australian bats’ heatwave problems

  1. Pingback: Australian bats' heatwave problems | Garry Roge...

  2. Pingback: Frogs mating, and the bats danger | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Good European bats news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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