Oldest mating insect fossils discovered


This image shows a holotype male, on the right, and allotype female, on the left. Credit: PLoS ONE 8(11): e78188. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078188

From Phys.org today:

Earliest record of copulating insects discovered

1 hour ago

Scientists have found the oldest fossil depicting copulating insects in northeastern China, published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dong Ren and colleagues at the Capital Normal University in China.

Fossil records of mating insects are fairly sparse, and therefore our current knowledge of mating position and genitalia orientation in the early stages of evolution is rather limited.

In this study, the authors present a fossil of a pair of copulating froghoppers, a type of small insect that hops from plant to plant much like tiny frogs. The well-preserved fossil of these two froghoppers showed belly-to-belly mating position and depicts the male reproductive organ inserting into the female copulatory structure.

This is the earliest record of copulating insects to date, and suggests that froghoppers’ genital symmetry and mating position have remained static for over 165 million years. Ren adds, “We found these two very rare copulating froghoppers which provide a glimpse of interesting insect behavior and important data to understand their mating position and genitalia orientation during the Middle Jurassic.”

Now buzzing and whizzing around every continent, insects were mysteriously scarce in the fossil record until 325 million years ago — when they first took flight and, according to a new study, evolutionarily took off: here.

2 thoughts on “Oldest mating insect fossils discovered

  1. Pingback: Fossil insects discovered in Indian amber | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Eocene insect fossils and ancient Russia-Canada connection | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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