Good Australian tiger quoll news


This video from Australia is called Tiger Quolls at the Conservation Ecology Centre. It says about itself:

5 Sep 2012

A collection of videos of the resident Tiger Quolls (Spotted-tail Quolls) at the Conservation Ecology Centre on Cape Otway.

From Wildlife Extra:

First Tiger quoll spotted in Australian National Park for 141 years

Victoria‘s Grampians National Park spots Tiger quoll after 141 year absence

October 2013. Presumed locally extinct for 141 years, a Tiger Quoll has been caught on remote digital camera in Victoria’s Grampians National Park in Southern Australia. The animal was captured on cameras set up to monitor the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby population. The Tiger Quoll, also known as the Spotted-tail Quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial native to Australia.

Parks Victoria‘s Manager of the Grampians Ark fox control program, Ben Holmes said: “I honestly couldn’t believe my eyes when the photos were sent through from our field crew. There is no mistaking the spotted body colour, which can only be a quoll.”

The sighting is the first confirmed live record of a Tiger Quoll in the Grampians National Park since 1872, after an animal was killed at the headwaters of the Glenelg River.

Grampians National Park Ranger in Charge Dave Roberts said this was is an exciting find for all staff who had worked on conservation programs in the Grampians over the years.

“We have been undertaking extensive fire management, fox control and other conservation works for decades and this sighting adds to our knowledge and importance of our work to conserve these species,” said Mr Roberts. “Having a native predator in the system is a great sign that the park is supporting a healthy, functioning ecosystem.”

Endangered in Victoria

Tiger Quolls are endangered in Victoria, with the south-east Australian population endangered nationally and listed as ‘near threatened’ on the International Union for Conservation of Nature red list. Tiger quolls are more common in Tasmania and New South Wales, and a few still inhabit parts of Queensland too.

Parks Victoria will now refine camera monitoring techniques to hopefully build a better picture of how widespread the population is across the Grampians National Park, following several unconfirmed sightings over the years.

Parks Victoria Chief Executive Bill Jackson said: “This is an extremely exciting rediscovery after such a long time, which highlights the critical role parks play in conserving Victoria’s unique biodiversity.”

“Victoria’s parks conserve examples of over 80% of Victoria’s plants and animals and this rediscovery confirms the Grampians National Park as stronghold for biodiversity conservation.”

A comment about this article from Britain:

Congratulations Ozz

This is incontestably superb and heartening news.

I do hope that it spurs on Australians to nurture and cherish their wonderful natural heritage, even if they see fit to elect politicians who sound like they’re living in cloud cuckoo land (no names, no pack drill – oh ok, your current prime minister – in fact thinking about it, OUR prime minister is idiotically detached environmentally too ! ).

Please be rightly delighted and hugely encouraged.

Posted by: Dominic Belfield | 18 Oct 2013 15:51:35

In a conservation catch-22, efforts to save quolls might endanger them. After 13 generations isolated from predators, the northern quoll lost its fear of them. By Leah Rosenbaum, 12:33pm, June 7, 2018.

Australian scientists plan to relocate wildlife threatened by climate change: here.

FOOD AIRDROPPED TO AUSTRALIA’S ANIMALS In a bid to save the endangered brush-tailed rock-wallaby, the New South Wales state government arranged a drop of thousands of pounds of vegetables to fire-affected areas last week. The drop was part of a major post-fire wildlife recovery effort being carried out statewide. [HuffPost]

3 thoughts on “Good Australian tiger quoll news

  1. Pingback: Invasive cane toads stopped in Australia | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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