New Madagascan lemur research


The Sahamalaza sportive lemur (Lepilemur sahamalazensis) roosts during the day in rather open situations such as tree holes. (Credit: Image copyright Melanie Seiler)

From ScienceDaily:

Solitary Lemurs Avoid Danger With a Little Help from the Neighbors

July 5, 2013 — An endangered species of Madagascan lemur uses the alarm calls of birds and other lemurs to warn it of the presence of predators, a new study by researchers from the University of Bristol and Bristol Zoo with the University of Torino has found. This is the first time this phenomenon has been observed in a solitary and nocturnal lemur species.

Very little is known about the Sahamalaza sportive lemur (Lepilemur sahamalazensis), other than the fact it roosts during the day in rather open situations, such as tree holes, and therefore risks falling victim to predators from both the air and the ground.

Sportive lemurs are not kept in any zoo. Prior to this research virtually nothing was known about this particular species despite the fact that it has been classified as Critically Endangered, the top threat category of the International Union for Conservation of Nature‘s (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species, at a red-listing workshop in Madagascar in July 2012. …

The lemurs of Sahamalaza National Park in northwest Madagascar are threatened by deforestation, hunting and forest fragmentation. Bristol Zoo is working to preserve the small bits of forest, roughly 200 hectares on the Sahamalaza Peninsula, that they have left which is vitally important for the continued survival of this and other lemur species.

6 thoughts on “New Madagascan lemur research

  1. Pingback: Tunisian fossil primate discovery | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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  4. Pingback: Madagascar lemurs, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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