Saudi women can now ride bikes


This video is called Detained, Tortured and Without Trial, a Saudi Political Prisoner Returns Home.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain today:

Women allowed to ride bikes

SAUDI ARABIA: Women will now be allowed to ride motorbikes and bicycles, but only in restricted recreational areas.

The powerful religious police say that women can ride bikes in parks and recreational areas but they have to be accompanied by a male relative and dress in the full Islamic head-to-toe abaya.

The official says women may not use the bikes for transport but “only for entertainment” and that they should shun places where young men gather, “to avoid harassment.”

This is a ridiculously small concession to the Saudi women’s movemernt, which demands that women should have the right not just to ride bikes, but drive cars as well. And not just for “recreation”, but for all types of transport for which men use these as well.

However, even this ridiculously small concession is a sign that the tyrannical repression in the Saudi absolute monarchy is not really working well for the rulers any more. This should give pro-democracy movements in Saudi Arabia more confidence for mass pressure for bigger improvements.

Saudi Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Luhaydan says that women should not be permitted to drive cars because driving hurts a woman’s pelvis and ovaries, thus causing children with birth defects: here.

25 thoughts on “Saudi women can now ride bikes

  1. C’est énervant cette nouvelle loi qui infériorise encore la femme saoudienne. Mais ce qui m’énerve encore plus, c’est ces imbéciles et hypocrites responsables saoudiens quand il se réfèrent à la religion musulmane pour élaborer des lois qui abaissent de la valeur de la femme que l’Islam a privilégiée et lui a permis d’exercer toutes les fonctions et d’accomplir les travaux licites convenant à sa nature.

    Like

      • L’Islam a donné à la femme tous les droits que la femme actuelle lutte pour les avoir tout en respectant sa personne dans la dignité et la fierté d’un être humain responsable et conscient de son existence. Ce sont ces fanatiques religieux qui ont rendu la femme à l’état de l’esclavage au nom de l’Islam. Il n’y a de différence entre la femme et l’homme que par le degré de la piété. Les mauvaises traditions et coutumes ont fait de la femme une esclave mais ce n’est guère la religion.

        Like

  2. No es sobre Arabia Saudita sino sobre Irán. Ser mujer en Irán según Marjane Satrapi.
    Las mujeres no pueden correr porque el movimiento de su trasero puede ser provocador para los hombres

    Like

  3. My parents lived in Saudi Arabia in the late 60’s; my mother HATED not being able to drive so they would go way out of the village on picnics so Mom could just drive across the desert for awhile. I’ve worn her robe and burka a few times in my life…it is the most bizarre feeling to be so…shadowy. If women willingly and freely chooses such a lifestyle, to each his own. But that it is forced upon anyone to be so restricted…? Unimaginable. Freedom to ride a bike – in a limited area, no less – is indeed a rather puny and pathetic concession…

    Like

          • It’s funny that since they lived there for 2 yrs, you’d think my parents would have used some proper name when talking about but the whole ‘get-up’ Mom just called her “robe & veil” but sometimes with a curse word added to it – understandably! 🙂

            Like

              • They lived in the small village of Tabuk (it was small then, not sure now); there was one American “camp” where most of the women spent their days. My parents did not understand why people would travel to another country and then sit in a room watching American TV and eating hamburgers all day so they never went to the camp. Dad is fluent in Arabic but Mom never learned as well…even still, she had many friends among the Saudi women and spent her days with them learning to cook the best food, ever. I still make Dolma the way she was taught by the women there. Back then no women were allowed at market, even with their husbands…I wonder how much that has changed and if things are better or worse now?

                Like

                • Hi, thanks for this interesting comment! Your dad was quite right in this.

                  Sometimes, if people go to other countries, they pick up some words in the local language, but not other words which may be important words. I was in Finland for a short time, but still one of the few Finnish words which I know is “korkeushyppy” (high jump in track and field).

                  Like

  4. Pingback: Saudi dictatorship’s Canadian weapons | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Saudi woman makes film | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Saudi Arabia’s new king, already another beheading | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Saudi Arabian beheadings, more and more | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: Ultra-orthodox Israeli ban on girls riding bikes | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  9. Pingback: Melania Trump’s rose-coloured glasses on Saudi women’s rights | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  10. Pingback: Saudi Arabia’s warmongering new crown prince | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.