Rare stone curlew back in the Netherlands


This is a video of stone curlews in Romania.

From Dutch daily De Volkskrant of 3 June 2010:

In the Amsterdamse Waterleidingduinen, a rare stone curlew has been seen. This bird, according to Ed Cousin, conservation official of Waternet, had not been seen in the area for at least 25 years. …

The stone curlew is listed as ‘extinct’ in the list of birds that breed in the Netherlands.

November 2010: Rare stone curlews in Wessex region have had their best ever breeding season, to the delight of conservationists and farmers working to save the bird. In total, 136 stone curlew bred across Wessex in 2010, raising 97 young birds successfully: here.

December 2010: Two decades of vital help from England’s farmers has seen the population of one of our rarest farmland birds more than double. The recovery of the stone curlew is a great example of the effectiveness of targeted conservation action and conservation organisations working closely with farmers. But, with conservation funding squeezed in last month’s Comprehensive Spending Review, the RSPB is concerned that the recovery may be halted – or worse – as some farmers will miss out on payments: here.

5 thoughts on “Rare stone curlew back in the Netherlands

  1. Pingback: Fallow deer, goldeneyes, foxes | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Rare stone curlews killed by cold spring | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Bird news from England | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Little owl and Thekla lark in Spain | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Stone curlew nest camera in England | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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