6 October peace actions USA


This video is called Robert Naiman on the Military Industrial Complex.

By Robert Naiman, Truthout in the USA:

On October 6, Let’s Make a National Clamor for Peace

Thursday 29 September 2011

On October 7, 2011, the United States will have been at war for ten years.

Let’s mark the occasion by making a national clamor for peace so loud that Congress, the president and big media will have to pay attention.

October 7 happens to fall on a Friday this year. If you get to choose, Friday is not necessarily the most strategic day to make a national clamor for peace, because 1) Congress will likely not be in session; 2) Friday is, in general, a crummy day to try to get media attention; and 3) even if these two things weren’t true or relevant, Friday is not a great day to try to hold public attention. People’s thoughts are turning to the weekend and then the weekend erases the chalkboard.

Moreover, the press has to cover the anniversary of the war, but these stories are going to be largely written and produced before Friday. The default media narrative will be: America has lost interest in the wars, because of the economy and unemployment, because “the wars are already winding down,” or some other story that journalists or editors will make up. We have to beat this default media narrative. To beat it, we need to get in front of it.

So, let’s mark the occasion on Thursday, October 6. Let’s have a national, “ecumenical” day of action for peace: to end the wars and cut the military budget.

By “ecumenical,” I mean this: everybody will “worship” in their own way. People who are willing to call Congress, will call Congress. People are willing to go to demonstrations, will go to demonstrations. People who get active online, will get active online. But everybody who wants peace will do something for peace on October 6. In the comments below, tell us what you are going to do to act for peace on October 6.

Call Congress: right now, the Congressional “supercommittee” is considering proposals to cut the US government debt by $1.2 trillion over ten years. One obvious choice: end the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and cut the military budget. Poll data shows that when you ask people “if the supercommittee cuts the budget, where should they cut?” military spending walks to victory. But the military contractors and war profiteers, who have grown fat from ten years of war spending, are pressing Congress not to cut the military budget and to cut your Medicare benefits instead. If you do nothing else for peace on October 6, call at least one of your representatives in Congress – particularly if they are on the supercommittee – and tell them to end the wars and cut the military budget. The Congressional switchboard is 202-225-3121.

In this speech on the budget, I explain why people who don’t want Congress to cut domestic spending and want to save the hundreds of thousands of jobs threatened by domestic spending cuts should be pounding on the supercommittee to end the wars and cut the military budget:

Demonstrate: on October 6, peace advocates will occupy Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. All around the country, “occupy [city]” protests are already springing up in solidarity with the Wall Street protests. If you can get to one of these protests, go. On October 6, raise the banner of peace. If “occupying” isn’t your cup of tea, have a vigil outside your representative or senator’s office, or a federal building, or anyplace where you will be visible to the public. Send a press release to all local media the morning of the day before and call the local media and make sure they got your press release and are thinking of coming.

Here’s an idea that might spark media interest: form a group called “Tea Party Patriots for Peace,” demanding cuts to wasteful big government spending on war. (After all, war spending is the majority of federal discretionary spending.) Stop taxing us to pay for war!

Buzz it up online. On October 6, help “action for peace” be a focus of attention online. Blog and comment about actions taking place for peace; share writing about and coverage of actions for peace by others. Help it be the case that you can’t look anywhere online on October 6 without seeing action for peace.

On Friday, October 7, don’t let big media say that Americans aren’t acting to press for peace. In the comments below, tell us what you are going to do to act for peace on October 6.

Kathy Kelly, Truthout: ” Consider the contrast between Gandhi’s precarious, defenseless efforts to reach his fellow humans, traveling alone and armed only with truth, and, in contrast, weigh U.S. reliance on a massive arsenal of weapons and armed warriors, costing the world $2 billion dollars per week in lost productivity”: here.

For all the reports, hearings and commissions about taking sexual assault in the military seriously, The Washington Post’s recent article about a radio show that has been broadcast to troops in Iraq paints a picture of blatant sexism and disrespect for women: here.

Afghanistan: French Public Opinion Dead Set Against the War: here.

England: Joe Glenton, the anti-war soldier who refused to go back to Afghanistan, is to deliver a letter to Downing Street demanding the troops be withdrawn: here.

Britain’s military police hve probed 100 incidents in which UK forces were accused of killing/wounding Afghan civilians: here.

Anti-war campaigners slammed the Ministry of Defence today for claiming that British troops have only killed 30 Afghan civilians since 2005: here.

Stop the War Coalition convener Lindsey German looks back at 10 years of conflict that have brought death and misery at home and abroad: here.

Ten Years After: Ten Afghan Perspectives in Film. Community Supported Film, Truthout: “The tenth anniversaries of 9/11 and the October 7 US-led invasion of Afghanistan are upon us. As Americans reflect on the impact of these events on our lives, the grassroots film series ‘The Fruit of Our Labor’ reflects on the situation from an Afghan perspective. Seven of the ten films focus on women and women’s issues; four of which were filmed and produced by Afghan women. Their cameras eavesdrop on the saucy banter of women as they tend to everyday tasks such as baking bread and planting seedlings, and on their consoling but firm words as they counsel each other in the aftermath of traumatic war injuries”: here.

2 thoughts on “6 October peace actions USA

  1. Afghans hold anti-U.S. rally on eve of war anniversary

    KABUL | Thu Oct 6, 2011 8:04am EDT

    (Reuters) – Hundreds of Afghans marched through Kabul on Thursday, the eve of the 10-year anniversary of the U.S. military campaign in Afghanistan, to condemn the United States as occupiers and demand the immediate withdrawal of all foreign troops.

    About 300 men and women gathered early in the morning with placards and banners accusing the United States of “massacring” civilians while denouncing President Hamid Karzai as a puppet subservient to Washington.

    “Occupation – atrocities – brutality,” read one sign, held aloft by two women with scarves covering their head and face.

    “No to occupation” said another placard, as a U.S. flag was set on fire. Another banner featured a caricature of Karzai as a glove puppet holding a pen and signing a document entitled “promises to the USA.”

    The rally, near a shrine and river in downtown Kabul, lasted around three hours, and ended peacefully.

    Karzai became Afghanistan’s leader in June 2002, seven months after Northern Alliance forces supported by the United States entered Kabul and drove the Taliban regime from power.

    Karzai won subsequent elections in 2005 and 2009.

    “Ten years since the invasion, all we have seen is suffering, instability and poverty in our country,” said protest organizer Hafizullah Rasikh.

    One picture that featured prominently was that of U.S. soldier Andrew Holmes posing with the corpse of an unarmed teenage Afghan villager who he had gunned down. He was sentenced to seven years in prison for the 2010 murder.

    The United States bears the brunt of criticism of the Western presence in Afghanistan.

    “The bloodshed I see in this country is the result of the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. After the invaders leave, our country will be peaceful,” shouted one man on a loudspeaker.

    (Reporting by Akram Walizada and Mohammad Aziz; Writing by Martin Petty; Editing by Emma Graham-Harrison and Sugita Katyal)

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  2. Pingback: US military spying on civilians’ financial records | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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