Greek workers fight austerity


This video is called Greek workers in new protest against cuts.

From daily News Line in Britain:

Thursday, 8 September 2011

MASS SACKINGS IN GREECE!

HUNDREDS of thousands of Greek workers, students and unemployed are expected to take part in rallies and demonstrations in Athens and Salonica on Saturday against government plans for mass sackings and privatisation.

Speaking in the Reichstag on Tuesday, the German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble called on the Greek government to honour its promises and impose immediately the economic ‘structural changes’ and privatisations.

Otherwise, he said, the Greek government won’t get the next IMF-European Committee loan instalment due at the end of September.

Just a couple of hours later the Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos answered his masters’ demands by loudly proclaiming in the Vouli’s (Greek parliament’s) Economic Committee that ‘all the privatisations and all the quantitative targets for 2011 (agreed with the EC) will be carried out, and we will move ahead with extreme speed.’ …

The Greek Cabinet also decided to further cut the wages of public sector workers and implement a plan to sack some 15,000 by the end of the year. All allowances to public service workers are to disappear while 200,000 will be ‘evaluated’ with the prospect of being put into ‘reserve’ for a year, getting just two thirds of their wages and then sacked.

The Deputy President of the ADEDY (public sector workers trade union federation) Elias Vretakos said that the government is ‘carrying out a pogrom against public services and workers.’

Taxi drivers, hospital doctors and dentists walked off the job in Greece today at the start of a new wave of protests against the Socialist Party government’s drive to make working people pay off its debts: here.

Over 300 university departments were under students’ occupation throughout Greece last Thursday when the Athens students mounted a most militant demonstration of over 4,000, including a large contingent of university lecturers and secondary education teachers: here.

Greek PM George Papandreou pledged to keep hacking away at what remains of the country’s public sector during a keynote speech in Thessaloniki on Saturday, even as 25,000 people rallied against the cuts: here. And here.

Indignant Greeks to Launch Protest, Sept 14th: here.

2 thoughts on “Greek workers fight austerity

  1. Athenian transportation workers call four-hour stoppage

    Workers on the ISAP electric urban railway and the Athens metro called a four-hour stoppage for September 7 to protest “government plans to streamline their sector,” according to Greek daily eKathimerini.

    Staff at the Metro and overland rail transportation networks struck for 24 hours in protest against mergers in Athens’ public transport last week.

    Greek cabbies strike over deregulation

    Taxi drivers and owners (approximately 30,000) called a 24-hour strike for September 8 to oppose the government “deregularisation of their profession,” according to The Greek Reporter.

    Taxi drivers carried out almost two weeks of industrial action last month over the same issue.

    According to the Ana press agency, the strike will end at 5am September 9. The drivers are to hold a general meeting and plan a protest at the Thessaloniki International Fair.

    http://wsws.org/articles/2011/sep2011/wkrs-s09.shtml

    Like

  2. Greek police fire tear gas at protesting cabbies

    By COSTAS KANTOURIS, NICHOLAS PAPHITIS

    THESSALONIKI, Greece — Riot police fired tear gas Saturday to disperse anti-austerity protesters armed with flare guns, stones and sticks as clashes broke out in Greece’s second-largest city.

    From taxi drivers to sports fans, thousands of angry citizens were protesting in the northern port of Thessaloniki before the prime minister’s annual speech on the economy.

    George Papandreou’s government has imposed painful austerity measures — cutting pensions and salaries while raising taxes and retirement ages — to secure vital international rescue loans worth €219 billion ($302.6 billion). But its efforts to economize while reviving a fast-contracting economy amid record unemployment have faltered, sparking new market distress.

    The protests came in waves Saturday. Several thousand taxi drivers angry over new licensing reforms chanted anti-government slogans as they marched, many throwing plastic water bottles at riot police guarding the trade fair where Papandreou was to speak later.

    An estimated 1,500 students and anarchists followed on their heels, while other crowds gathered for separate protests by the barely-solvent country’s two biggest labor unions.

    Even fans of Thessaloniki’s soccer club Iraklis turned out to protest.

    Police detained at least 44 people, many for simply carrying gas masks, ahead of the marches and arrested one for possession of fireworks.

    On Friday, about 100 protesters heckled Papandreou during a visit to Thessaloniki’s town hall, and police officers in uniform themselves held a peaceful march.

    In Athens, about 2,000 members of a Communist union held a peaceful protest early Saturday.

    The Socialist government has imposed painful austerity measures — cutting pensions and salaries while raising taxes and retirement ages — to secure vital international rescue loans worth €219 billion ($302.6 billion). But its efforts to economize while reviving a fast-contracting economy amid record unemployment have faltered, sparking new market distress.
    Advertise | AdChoices

    On Friday, Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos was forced to deny rumors of impending bankruptcy over the weekend.

    The default rumors, combined with the sudden resignation of senior European Central Bank official Juergen Stark, created fresh market fears that sent yields on Greek 10-year bonds surging to 21 percent. Greece has the worst credit rating in the world, just shy of default.

    Venizelos insisted Saturday that the country could still pull through.

    Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.