New Indian frog species discovered


This video from India says about itself:

Wrestlers Of Western Ghats

31 March 2016

This documentary is a research communication as narrated by an artist. The movie offers a compelling reason to change the common description of Micixalus species from “dancing frogs” to “wrestling frogs”!

From iFrog:

Scientists find 10 new frog species

by ifrog boss on August 7, 2011

A team headed by Dr Anil Zachariah, a renowned scientist, has discovered 10 new species of frogs from the hill ranges of Southern Western Ghats with the help of Zoological Survey of India.

The new discovery has been published in the latest issue of the Biosytamatica

sic; Biosystematica

, an international journal on animal taxonomy, ecology and zoogeography. Of the 10 species, 9 species of frogs belonged to the Raorchestes genus.

The remaining one belongs to the Polypedates genus under the family Rhacophoridae. The new species were spotted during several expeditions carried out by the team led by Dr.Zachariah.

“These findings show that Western Ghats, a biodiversity hotspot of the world still has many new species of amphibians,” Dr.Zachariah told Deccan Chronicle.

He said four species were discovered from Bonacaud Estate, Thiruvananthapuram, two from Kadalar Estate, Idukki, one from Gavi, Pathanamthitta, and the rest from Nilgiri region in Tamil Nadu.

Of the 10 new species, six are bush frogs, one a canopy bush frog and two are associated with reeds. With this, total Polypedates species known till date from Western Ghats has become four and 11 from the country.

The new species have also received some interesting names. One species in the Raorchestes genus has been described as Raorchestes agasthyaensis after the Vedic sage Agasthya while Raorchestes manohari is named after principal chief conservator of forests T.M.Manoharan.

Dr.Zachariah said the study was conducted without any funding from any agencies.

His team comprised Prof. E. Kunhikrishnan, Dinesh K.P., Muhamed Jafer Palot, Sandeep Das, David V Raju, C. Radhakrishnan, S. Kalesh and C.K. Vishnudas.

See also here.

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2 thoughts on “New Indian frog species discovered

  1. 12 new frog species discovered, 3 rediscovered by Delhi biologist

    Sathyabhama Das Biju, an Indian amphibian biologist, who teaches at the University of Delhi has been credited with more than a hundred discoveries in the field of amphibian research, including the latest 12 species he chronicled.

    He and his team have spent their time either in the lab or combing tropical mountain forests, looking under rocks and waiting for croaks in the night. Finally, they have come out with new 12 frog species and another three that many other researchers thought were extinct.

    With 32 percent of the world’s known amphibian species threatened with extinction, Global Wildlife Conservation warns that these are indications to utlimate danger to our environment and pollution.

    “Frogs are extremely important indicators not just of climate change, but also pollutants in the environment,” says Biju.

    Biju and his student researchers have listed the new species by description and genetics.

    The 12 new species include the meowing night frog, whose croak sounds more like a cat’s call, the jog night frog, unique in that both the males and females watch over the eggs, and the Wayanad night frog, which grows to the size of a baseball or cricket ball.

    Three other species — the Coorg night frog described 91 years ago, was rediscovered by his team.

    In his latest publication in the international taxonomy journal Zootaxa — Biju brings the known number of frogs in India to 336, which he says was only half of the world’s species.

    In addition, the elegant tropical frog species was rediscovered along the western coast and 11 more rediscoveries were “unexpected surprises,” according to Conservation International, which co-led the 2010 project with the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Amphibian Specialist Group.

    September 18th, 2011

    http://www.microfinancemonitor.com/2011/09/18/12-new-frog-species-discovered-3-rediscovered-by-delhi-biologist/

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  2. Scientists Discover 12 New Frog Species In India

    by The Associated Press

    NEW DELHI September 17, 2011, 08:47 pm ET

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Years of combing tropical mountain forests, shining flashlights under rocks and listening for croaks in the night have paid off for a team of Indian scientists that has discovered 12 new frog species plus three others thought to have been extinct.

    It’s a find the team hopes will bring attention to India’s amphibians and their role in gauging the health of the environment.

    Worldwide, 32 percent of the world’s known amphibian species are threatened with extinction, largely because of habitat loss or pollution, according to the group Global Wildlife Conservation.

    “Frogs are extremely important indicators not just of climate change, but also pollutants in the environment,” said the project’s lead scientist, biologist Sathyabhama Das Biju of the University of Delhi.

    Many of the newly found frogs in India are rare and are living in just a single area, so they will need rigorous habitat protection, Biju told The Associated Press on Saturday. “Unfortunately in India, conservation has basically focused on the two most charismatic animals — the elephant and the tiger. For amphibians there is little interest, little funding, and frog research is not easy.”

    Night frogs are extremely hard to find, coming out only at dark and during the monsoon season, living either in fast-flowing streams or on moist forest ground.

    Biju said he and his student researchers had to sit in dark, damp forests listening for frog sounds and shining flashlights under rocks and across riverbeds. They confirmed the new species by description as well as genetics.

    The 12 new species include the meowing night frog, whose croak sounds more like a cat’s call, the jog night frog, unique in that both the males and females watch over the eggs, and the Wayanad night frog, which grows to about the size of a baseball or cricket ball. “It’s almost like a monster in the forest floor, a huge animal for a frog, leaping from one rock to another,” Biju said.

    Three other species were rediscovered, including the Coorg night frog described 91 years ago, after scientists “had completely ignored these animals, thinking they were lost.”

    The discoveries — published in the latest issue of international taxonomy journal Zootaxa — bring the known number of frogs in India to 336. Biju estimated this was only around half of what is in the wild, and said none of India’s amphibians are yet being studied for biological compounds that could be of further use in science.

    “We first have to find the species, know them and protect them, so that we can study them for their clinical importance,” he said.

    Biju is credited with discovering dozens of new Indian frog species during his 35-year career.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=140556098

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