Scottish desert island inhabited in prehistory?


This video is called St Kilda – BORERAY, GANNETS NESTING.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Remote island’s hidden history

Friday 17 June 2011

Archaeologists said today that they have discovered evidence of a permanent settlement that could date back to the Iron Age on one of Europe’s most inhospitable islands.

It had been thought that no people had ever lived on the St Kildan island of Boreray, 40 miles west of the Outer Hebrides in the Atlantic Ocean.

Inhabitants of nearby Hirta island used to visit Boreray only in the summer to hunt birds and gather wool, a practice which ended in the early 20th century.

But the new discovery suggests that people may have lived on the steep slopes of the island as far back as prehistoric times.

The remaining 36 inhabitants of the St Kilda archipelago were evacuated from the islands at their own request in 1930.

Archaeologists from the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland and the National Trust for Scotland made the new discovery on an eight-day research trip to the remote island.

Commission surveyor Ian Parker said: “This is an incredibly significant find which could change our understanding of the history of St Kilda.”

New species of dandelion discovered on St Kilda island: here.

Outer Hebrides beetles: here.

Rare and endangered beetles found on The Hebrides: here.

2 thoughts on “Scottish desert island inhabited in prehistory?

  1. Pingback: New Scottish island gannet colony | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Tuna and gannets in Scotland | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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