Leatherback turtle migration discoveries


This video is called Leatherbacks: Litoghahira, Solomon Islands.

From the University of Exeter in England:

Epic journeys of turtles revealed

January 5, 2011 02:09 AM

The epic ocean-spanning journeys of the gigantic leatherback turtle in the South Atlantic have been revealed for the first time thanks to groundbreaking research using satellite tracking.

Experts at the Centre for Ecology and Conservation (Cornwall) at the University of Exeter led a five-year study to find out more about these increasingly rare creatures and inform conservation efforts.

The research, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B today [5th January 2011], has shed new light on the little-known migration behaviour of these animals – following their movement from the world’s largest breeding colony in Gabon, Central Africa, as they returned to feeding grounds across the South Atlantic.

The research has been carried out with the help of Parcs Gabon, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), PTMG (Marine Turtle Partnership for Gabon), the Trans-Atlantic Leatherback Conservation Initiative (TALCIN) – a multi-partner effort coordinated by WWF, and SEATURTLE.org.

Out of 25 females studied in the new research, three migratory routes were identified – including one 7,563km (4,699 mile) journey straight across the South Atlantic from Africa to South America.

Other routes still involved large distances, as they moved from Gabon to food-rich habitats in the southwest and southeast Atlantic and off the coast of Central Africa. They will stay in these areas for 2-5 years to build up the reserves to reproduce, when they will return to Gabon once again.

Dr Matthew Witt said: “Despite extensive research carried out on leatherbacks, no-one has really been sure about the journeys they take in the South Atlantic until now. What we’ve shown is that there are three clear migration routes as they head back to feeding grounds after breeding in Gabon, although the numbers adopting each strategy varied each year. We don’t know what influences that choice yet, but we do know these are truly remarkable journeys – with one female tracked for thousands of miles travelling in a straight line right across the Atlantic.”

In the Pacific ocean, leatherback turtles have seen a precipitous decline over the past three decades – with one nesting colony in Mexico declining from 70,000 in 1982 to just 250 by 1998-9*. The exact cause of the dramatic fall-off in numbers is not clear, but turtle egg harvesting, coastal gillnet fishing, and longline fishing have been identified as potential factors.

In the Atlantic, population levels have been more robust but, due to variations in numbers at nesting sites each year, it’s not clear whether they are in decline. Conservationists are keen to take action now to avoid a repeat of the Pacific story.

Dr Brendan Godley said the new research would be vital for informing this conservation strategy: “All of the routes we’ve identified take the leatherbacks through areas of high risk from fisheries, so there’s a very real danger to the Atlantic population. Knowing the routes has also helped us identify at least 11 nations who should be involved in conservation efforts, as well as those with long-distance fishing fleets. There’s a concern that the turtles we tracked spent a long time on the High Seas, where it’s very difficult to implement and manage conservation efforts, but hopefully this research will help inform future efforts to safeguard these fantastic creatures.”

Dr. Howard Rosenbaum, Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Ocean Giants Program, said: “This important work shows that protecting leatherback turtles—the ancient mariners of our oceans—requires research and conservation on important nesting beaches, foraging areas and important areas of the high seas. Armed with a better understanding of migration patterns and preferences for particular areas of the ocean, the conservation community can now work toward protecting leatherbacks at sea, which has been previously difficult.”

See also here.

Tagging and tracking leatherback sea turtles has produced new insights into the turtles’ behavior in a part of the South Pacific Ocean long considered an oceanic desert. The new data will help researchers predict the turtles’ movements in the ever-changing environment of the open ocean, with the goal of reducing the impact of fishing on the endangered leatherback population: here.

Sea turtles hatching in the USA: here.

January 20, 2011 – Orange Beach, AL (OBA) – Gulf of Mexico (GOM) – Two hundred forty-two cold-stunned sea turtles removed from St. Joseph Bay this winter were released Wednesday into the Gulf of Mexico off Cape San Blas in Gulf County. All were green turtles. Twenty-five Kemp’s ridleys, also rescued from the cold, will be released at a later date, along with green turtles that need additional rehabilitation: here.

The life and times of the Green Sea Turtle: here.

Sea turtle nesting in the U.S. is still a couple months away, but I just couldn’t wait to write something about my new RBFF (reptilian best friend forever) – the sea turtle: here.

6 thoughts on “Leatherback turtle migration discoveries

  1. Leatherback Sea Turtles travel over 10,000 miles a year

    January 19, 2011 11:31 PM EST

    Among the group of 25 female leatherback turtles tracked by scientists, Darwinia was the best diving sea turtle out of all. Scientists placed a simple transmitter on the back of the turtle and tracked them for over 5 years. The transmitter was powered by four lithium camera batteries.

    The signal from the transmitter was sent to a satellite everytime when the turtle came up for an air.

    Some of the turtles traveled over 10,000 miles (16,000 km) every year.

    The leatherback sea turtle is the largest of all living sea turtles and the fourth largest modern reptile behind three crocodilians.

    Leatherback turtles also have the most hydrodynamic body design of any sea turtle, with a large, teardrop shaped body.

    It is estimated that approximately 98% of leatherback turtles have disappeared from the Pacific Ocean for the last 40 years.

    http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/102861/20110120/darwinia-deepest-diving-sea-turtle.htm

    Like

  2. Pingback: Turtles and tortoises in Puerto Rico and Britain | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Leatherback turtles, new study | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Young loggerhead turtle survives beaching in the Netherlands | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: Good Florida sea turtle news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: Pacific ocean animals’ migrations, new study | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.